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Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)

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Ideas is all about ideas \x96 programs that explore everything from culture and the arts to science and technology to social issues.

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How Internet Monopolies Threaten Democracy (Encore Dec 15, 2017)

54:36 | May 4th

The unfulfilled promise of the internet has been a long-term concern of Digital Media and Global Affairs expert Dr. Taylor Owen, who delivers the 2017 Dalton Camp Lecture in Journalism. He argues the reality of the internet is now largely one of cont...Show More

Christopher Hedges: Farewell America

54:42 | Nov 19th

Christopher Hedges believes that America may well be in its last act. Addiction, income disparity and hollowed-out towns and cities are becoming the norm, he argues, while the political and financial sectors increasingly merge with each other to the ...Show More

The Illusion of Money, Part 1 (Encore February 24, 2016)

54:39 | Feb 21st

We think we know what money is. We use it every day and our lives are unimaginable without it. But look more closely and you find that coins and dollar bills aren't "real". They're promises, symbols, ideas. And exactly what money is has evolved enorm...Show More

In Search of Global Freedom

54:47 | Dec 10th

What does it mean to be free? All societies place restrictions on what citizens can do, but some restrictions (speed limits) may be more important than others (limiting the right to vote.) But one-size freedom doesn't really fit all: "democracy" has ...Show More

Flirting with Fascism: America's New Path?

54:26 | Nov 29th

We've heard it so much that it's almost become a cliché: America is on the road to fascism. The debate over that claim continues, but renowned scholar Henry Giroux argues that "Donald Trump is not just some impulsive rich guy who marketed his way int...Show More

Wade Davis: Light at the edge of the world (Encore January 23, 2018)

54:25 | Nov 26th

In our age, many societies look like they're hurtling towards disorder and disunity. For all of our technological sophistication, the centre isn't holding, great civilisations seem less united than ever. Wade Davis thinks we need to pay more attentio...Show More

What to expect when you're expecting .... Climate Change

54:43 | Nov 21st

Young couples face a complicated decision at a time when the dire consequences of climate change are becoming clearer, is it ethical to bring a child into the world? Science journalist Britt Wray talks with parents, prospective parents, ethicists and...Show More

Human Rights Under Attack: Gareth Peirce on The New Dark Age

54:42 | Nov 7th

For more than 40 years, Gareth Peirce has fought to expose and overturn miscarriages of justice and free the wrongfully accused. Based in London, she was instrumental in freeing members of the Guildford Four, who were falsely convicted of carrying ou...Show More

The Long Arm of Ayn Rand: Why She Still Matters, Part 1

54:42 | Nov 1st

The intelligentsia mocked her writings and lampooned her philosophy, which she called Objectivism. But Ayn Rand's books, especially her two major works The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged, continue to sell millions of copies. There are Ayn Rand think...Show More

Conservative with Age: Why your political stripes change over time (Encore December 11, 2017)

54:43 | Oct 29th

If you're not a socialist at twenty, you have no heart; and if you're not a conservative at forty, you have no brain." The saying has been around since at least the late 19th century, and it's not entirely clear who coined it. But the fact that it's ...Show More

Have I Got A Story For You!

54:42 | Oct 25th

Narrative thinking is how we process and understand our own story. American psychologist, Dan McAdams wrote, "We are all storytellers, and we are the stories we tell." But some of us have no unfolding internal autobiography that helps us bridge our ...Show More

A book lover, his library and the Scottish Enlightenment (Encore February 22, 2018)

54:43 | Oct 11th

Two hundred and fifty years ago, a relatively remote and economically-challenged country called Scotland became the surprising host to one of the most exciting intellectual developments in the world. Magically, the best and the brightest minds were b...Show More

The Scottish Enlightenment: The invention of modern mind and culture (Encore Jan 25, 2018)

54:47 | Oct 4th

Approximately 250 years ago, the windswept and unwelcoming capital of a relatively insignificant northern nation became a beacon of intelligence for the entire world. Paul Kennedy walks up and down 'The Royal Mile', and through the planned streets an...Show More

The Enright Files on Race and Racism

54:39 | Oct 1st

Decades after the civil rights era, the post-colonial movement, and the beginning of the multiculturalism project, racism that had lain in the shadows of Western democracies is out in the open and thriving. On this month's edition of The Enright File...Show More

Is Neoliberalism destroying the world?

54:36 | Sep 26th

Deregulation. Infinite growth. Self-correcting markets. All are hallmarks of neoliberal thinking. But they're more than just assumptions about the economy. They undergird much of the most influential thinking about governance right now, and dominate ...Show More

Biocentrism: Rethinking Time, Space, Consciousness, and the Illusion of Death (Encore Oct 4, 2016)

54:53 | Sep 20th

Paul Kennedy has his understanding of reality turned-upside-down by Dr. Robert Lanza in this paradigm-shifting hour. Dr. Lanza provides a compelling argument for consciousness as the basis for the universe, rather than consciousness simply being its ...Show More

Planet You: The mysterious world of the microbiome

54:53 | Sep 18th

There are trillions of them on -- and in -- our bodies. Microbes have existed on earth for more than three and a half billion years. Makes you wonder who's playing host to whom, and whether we humans are merely vessels for these tiny survivors. They ...Show More

What can Shakespeare teach us about Donald Trump?

55:01 | Sep 11th

Political institutions in disarray, brutal behaviour on every side, narcissistic leaders lying to the public - sound familiar? It certainly was to Shakespeare. His plays reveal the toxic psychology that fuels a despot, as well as those who enable th...Show More

Creative Minds: Can art speak truth?

55:01 | Sep 10th

Truth and lies. Ideology and imagination. Politics and polarization. Novelist Salman Rushdie, performance artist Andrea Fraser, filmmaker Charles Officer, and musician Iskwé wrestle with making sense of our chaotic world through their work. This AGO ...Show More

Michael Crummey on writing and the relationship between fact and fiction

55:02 | Sep 7th

What does a novelist owe to the past? How does a writer walk the tightrope between telling a story and accurately reflecting history and geography? Acclaimed novelist Michael Crummey reflects on these questions in the annual Henry Kreisel Lecture in ...Show More

Internal Hard Drive: What's lost when we forget to remember

55:02 | Sep 6th

We rely on our handy smartphones to remember everything from phone numbers to our friend's birthdays. Those sleek devices serve as a type of 'external hard drive' for our memory. Contributor Jess Shane explores what happens when the art of memorizati...Show More

The Enright Files on the state of democracy in 2018

55:02 | Sep 4th

These are anxious times for liberal democracy's true believers. They've seen the rise of strongman autocrats and xenophobic populists across a full spectrum of democratic countries, not to mention the disruptive force of Donald Trump. Cyber attacks, ...Show More

The Politics of the Professoriat: Political diversity on campus (Encore September 8, 2017)

54:55 | Aug 31st

Universities are supposed to be dedicated to the exchange of ideas. But according to social psychologist Jonathan Haidt, campuses now skew so far to the left that they've become "political monocultures".

Canada's original promise: Still waiting to be realized (Encore June 30, 2017)

54:57 | Aug 24th

As Canada turned 150, the final talk brought the series back home, with Indigenous education advocate Roberta Jamieson. Roberta was the first woman chief of Six Nations of the Grand River, the first Indigenous woman to earn a law degree in Canada, an...Show More

The Self-Taught Philosopher: How a 900-year-old Arabic Tale Inspired the Enlightenment (Encore May 16 2017)

54:57 | Aug 21st

Naheed Mustafa tells the story of philosopher-physician Ibn Tufayl who wrote the first Arabic novel "Hayy ibn Yaqzan". It may be the most important story you've never heard.

A Peasant vs The Inquisition: Cheese, Worms and the Birth of Micro-history (Encore March 21 2017)

54:58 | Aug 20th

Celebrated historian Carlo Ginzburg uncovers the past by telling the stories of the marginalized, the forgotten, and the suppressed.

Precarious Work: David Weil on the disappearing company job (Encore December 5, 2017)

54:58 | Aug 14th

For most of the 20th century, everyone, from the janitor on up to the CEO, was employed by the company. But now large corporations are outsourcing work to small companies. A lecture and interview with scholar and former Obama appointee David Weil.

Decoding Death: The science and significance of near death experiences (Encore Dec 7/16)

54:54 | Jul 30th

People have reported "near death experiences", or NDE's, over centuries and across cultures. The nature of them has historically been the territory of religion and philosophy. But now science has staked its claim in the discussion. And the questions ...Show More

How filmmakers and fishers saved Fogo Island (Encore December 14, 2017)

54:57 | Jul 25th

A little over fifty years ago, the friendly folks on Fogo Island - most of whom were fishers - were ordered to abandon their homes and resettle in larger communities on the larger island of Newfoundland. Memorial University's Extension Department inv...Show More

The Matter of Meat: A history of pros & cons (Encore November 23, 2016)

54:58 | Jul 16th

Eating meat: some say we've evolved to do it. It's in our DNA. It's how we got our big brains. Yet others, as far back as Pythagoras, have argued that eating meat is bad for our bodies, cruel to animals, and toxic to the planet. Now -- perhaps more t...Show More

First Nations in the first person: Telling stories & changing lives

54:57 | Jul 6th

Canada's 150th anniversary highlighted its evolving relationship with Indigenous people. Too often in that history, voices other than those from First Nations did the talking for them. In this episode, Brielle Beardy-Linklater, Sandra Henry, and Theo...Show More

Gabrielle Scrimshaw on liberating the past and embracing the future (Encore February 16, 2019)

54:56 | Jul 6th

Gabrielle Scrimshaw delivers the third annual Vancouver Island University Indigenous Lecture on the challenges Indigenous youth face, what reconciliation looks like, and how people can engage on that journey.

Maximum Canada: How big is enough?

54:42 | Jun 29th

Acclaimed Globe & Mail journalist Doug Saunders argues in his book "Maximum Canada: Why 35 Million Canadians Are Not Enough" that Canada has had trouble keeping the immigrants it attracts. This "minimizing impulse", as he terms it, has to be jettison...Show More

Canada's slavery secret: The whitewashing of 200 years of enslavement

54:42 | Jun 28th

Why is it common knowledge that we saved runaway slaves from the United States, but few know that Africans and Indigenous peoples were bought, sold and exploited, right here? In the first of a two part series, contributor Kyle G. Brown asks how slave...Show More

Magic, Medicine and the Placebo Machine

54:42 | Jun 18th

Jay Olson performed his first magic trick when he was five years old. The former professional magician turned McGill University PhD student reveals how the power of suggestion can be used to help treat medical conditions. Central to his research is w...Show More

Creating Conscience, Part 3: A history of treating the psychopath

54:42 | Jun 13th

We're all familiar with the idea of the "bad seed". Incorrigible children and unruly adolescents who later commit terrible crimes. Over the last decade, they've increasingly been referred to as psychopaths. But unlike the way their adult counterparts...Show More

Foreign Policy + Feminism = ?

39:40 | Jun 1st

Foreign policy is usually defined in "masculine" terms: arms trade, intervention, war, sanctions, and MAD (mutually-assured destruction). But what would international relations look like if food security, family planning, and workplace equity were al...Show More

The Paris Riots of 1968, Part 2: A failed revolution that changed the world

54:34 | May 17th

Students taking to the streets to protest — it looked like a simple thing, fifty years ago in May 1968. But it proved to be the spark that started a conflagration. Thousands of demonstrators turned into hundreds of thousands, barricades were built, c...Show More

The Enright Files: Philosophy outside the Ivory Tower

54:35 | May 7th

As universities come under increasing pressure to prove their economic value — to both students and the business world — the humanities seem to be the first things put on the chopping block. And more than most disciplines, a philosophy degree is cons...Show More

Taming the Beast: Are violent urges part of men's nature?

54:37 | May 2nd

How does a just society reconcile the desire for peace, with the desire, most often by men, for violence? How much does nature stir boys, men, to fight? And to what extent can they control that stirring? Author Daemon Fairless takes IDEAS producer Ma...Show More

Playdoh's Republic: Children as natural philosophers (Encore December 19,2017)

54:49 | Apr 20th

Why were we born? Is life just a dream? What makes something wrong or right? Children often ask questions like these — sometimes to the exasperation of their parents. But children really want to know why the world is the way it is. And they want to k...Show More

How Martin Luther invented the modern world (Encore November 29, 2017)

54:49 | Apr 10th

It has been 500 years since Martin Luther supposedly nailed his 95 theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany. There's no proof he ever did that — and it may not matter. We're still living in the aftershocks of the religious, poli...Show More

Is Liberalism Doomed?

54:49 | Apr 10th

By the end of the Cold War, liberalism had emerged triumphant around much of the developed world -- until the recent rise of populism in Europe and the U.S. Suddenly, the political landscape is looking ominous. What is liberalism's future? A debate a...Show More

The enduring power of Albert Camus' L'Étranger (Encore December 8, 2017)

54:49 | Apr 5th

It's been 75 years since Albert Camus published "L'Étranger". And it continues to be the most translated book from French into English. Radio Canada producer Danny Braun speaks with a novelist, a rapper, some academics and a former death row inmate ...Show More

Why democracy depends on how we talk to each other (Encore November 28, 2017)

54:49 | Apr 5th

Does democracy have a future? It's a question is being asked in democracies everywhere. People are frustrated with politics and politicians. And politicians appear weary of democracy. Now populist uprisings to protect the status quo are threatening t...Show More

Philiosophers on politics in the age of Trump

54:32 | Apr 3rd

On this month's edition of The Enright Files, some of North America’s most astute political philosophers discuss the perplexing and troubling political trends of our times.

Steven Pinker and Ken Dryden: "Where there's a way, there's a will"

54:47 | Mar 14th

When NHL legend Ken Dryden was about to publish his book, "Game Change", he got in touch with Harvard psychologist and linguist, Steven Pinker, who was about to publish "Enlightenment Now". Their common ground: what does it actually take to change so...Show More

Into the Gray Zone with neuroscientist Adrian Owen

54:46 | Mar 12th

We've usually thought that people in comas or 'vegetative' states are completely cut off from the world. But groundbreaking work shows that as much as 20 per cent of patients whose brains were considered non-responsive, turn out to be vibrantly alive...Show More

Censorship and Identity: Free speech for me but not for you

54:46 | Mar 9th

Whether it’s redressing historical wrongs, new hate speech legislation, or safe spaces as a human right: when does the desire to accommodate aggrieved groups become censorship? And what's truly at stake? A debate from London’s “Battle of Ideas”.

The Human Factor: Hannah Arendt (Encore April 23, 2014)

54:45 | Mar 8th

Was Adolph Eichmann not ultimately responsible for the destruction of six million Jews? Or were Jews themselves partially to blame for their own fate? Fifty years ago, the political philosopher Hannah Arendt published a famous book that seemed to imp...Show More

The Enright Files:Your brain on digital technology

54:46 | Mar 5th

Our relationship with technology has intensified in this century with a rapturous embrace of Internet technologies and the gadgetry put in our hands by big technology companies. But even as we've made these technologies an extension of ourselves and ...Show More

Is There a Culture War Against Populism?

54:47 | Mar 2nd

Is it a positive wave or a troubling pattern? In this age of anxiety over joblessness and immigration, populist leaders in Hungary, Poland, Turkey, Sweden and the Philippines are tapping in. Is populism, as the 1960's American historian Richard Hofst...Show More

The Anatomy of Tyranny - Timothy Snyder

54:39 | Feb 23rd

Authoritarianism is on the rise around the world. And Timothy Snyder wants to push back against this tide. A history professor at Yale University who's written widely on Europe and the Holocaust, he takes an unusual approach in his little book, "On T...Show More

Imagining the singularity: What happens when computers transcend us?

54:40 | Feb 8th

As computers and Artificial Intelligence grow in power and capability, it seems ever more likely that we're approaching "the Singularity": the point where machine intelligence exceeds human intelligence. Could this be the dawn of a technological para...Show More

Why is there so much poverty in a rich country like Canada?

54:38 | Feb 7th

With so much wealth in the world, why is there so much poverty? In the end, we're all better off when everyone has a chicken in the pot. Poverty slows the development of all societies, and it seems obvious that we should try to eradicate it, but it s...Show More

Artificial intelligence, robots and the future of work (Encore September 13, 2017)

54:40 | Jan 31st

AI and robots seem to be everywhere, handling more and more work, freeing humans up -- to do what? Contributor Jill Eisen takes a wide-angle lens to the digital revolution happening in our working lives. What will happen when robots and algorithms s...Show More

Travels through Trump's America one year later

54:40 | Jan 19th

It’s been one year since Donald Trump’s inauguration. His official swearing-in compelled many Americans reflect on what America actually is now, politically, socially and culturally. Contributor David Zane Mairowitz is originally from America, and ha...Show More

The New Tribe of Israel: The immigrant underclass (Encore June 27, 2017)

54:39 | Jan 9th

Anthrolopogist Galia Sabar has devoted her professional life to what she calls the new tribe of Israel: Jewish-African and non-Jewish labour migrants, asylum seekers, and refugees.

The Enright Files on suffering, sorrow and the search for meaning

54:39 | Jan 3rd

This month's edition of The Enright Files explores how the works of Viktor Frankl, Anton Chekhov and Joan Didion wrestle meaning and solace from tragedy, horror and suffering.

The Idea of Insomnia

54:40 | Dec 22nd, 2017

PhD student Katie Hunt ties together lines of Romantic era poetry with scientific research on sleep... to reveal how our concept of insomnia evolved, and how the poems still have power to open our minds.

Playdoh's Republic: Children as natural philosophers

54:42 | Dec 19th, 2017

Why were we born? Is life just a dream? What makes something wrong or right? Children really want to know why the world is the way it is. They're open, curious and inquisitive — they're natural philosophers.

Dr. Taylor Owen on how internet monopolies threaten democracy (The 2017 Dalton Camp Lecture)

54:43 | Dec 15th, 2017

Dr. Taylor Owen delivers the 2017 Dalton Camp Lecture in Journalism. He argues the reality of the internet is now largely one of control, by four platform companies -- Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple and their impact on democracy is deeply troubli...Show More

The enduring power of Albert Camus' L'Étranger

54:43 | Dec 8th, 2017

It's been 75 years since Albert Camus published L'Étranger and it continues to be the most translated book from French into English. Danny Braun explores the enduring appeal of L'Étranger — both to the intellect and to the heart.

Lecture 5: "In Search of a Better World" by Payam Akhavan (The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures)

1:09:12 | Nov 10th, 2017

A call to action for our times, Payam Akhavan's 2017 CBC Massey Lectures is a powerful survey of some of the major human rights struggles of our times. Lecture 5, "The Spirit of Human Rights", was recorded in front of an audience in Toronto.

Lecture 1: "In Search of a Better World" by Payam Akhavan (2017 CBC Massey Lectures)

1:01:48 | Nov 6th, 2017

A call to action for our times, Payam Akhavan's 2017 CBC Massey Lectures is a powerful survey of some of the major human rights struggles of our times. Lecture 1, "The Knowledge of Suffering", was recorded in front of an audience in Whitehorse, Yuk...Show More

Democracy Undermined? Debating the impact of Donald Trump's presidency on democracy

54:45 | Nov 2nd, 2017

The Munk Debates put it starkly: Be It Resolved, American democracy is in its worst crisis in a generation, and Donald J. Trump is to blame. Andrew Sullivan and E. J. Dionne argue in favour of the resolution, Kimberley Strassel and Newt Gingrich agai...Show More

El Sistema: How the power of music helped change Venezuelan lives

54:44 | Oct 23rd, 2017

"Playing for Their Lives" - a documentary by Philip Coulter about El Sistema: a radical music education programme in Venezuela designed to get young people off the streets founded by Juan Antonio Abru.

The Enright Files on Vladimir Putin's Russia

54:47 | Oct 17th, 2017

In 1917, Russia's tsarist dynasty was overthrown and a Communist government took power. A century later, Russia is very much the state of Vladimir Putin, who rules as a strange hybrid of tsarism, Stalinism and post-Cold War turbocharged capitalism.

Choose Life: The Lost Massey Lecture by George Wald

54:47 | Oct 4th, 2017

In 1970, outspoken Harvard biologist George Wald became the first natural scientist to give the CBC Massey Lectures. Lewis Auerbach produced the 1970 Wald lectures. He tells the remarkable backstory of Wald and his Massey talks.

Less work and more leisure: Utopian visions and the future of work

54:37 | Sep 27th, 2017

In Part 3 of her series on the future of work, Jill Eisen looks at the promise of technology — and how it can lead to a better world.

The Self-Taught Philosopher (Encore May 16, 2017)

54:36 | Sep 25th, 2017

Naheed Mustafa tells the story of philosopher-physician Ibn Tufayl who wrote the first Arabic novel "Hayy ibn Yaqzan". It may be the most important story you've never heard.

The Future of Work, Part 2: The highs and lows of digital platforms

54:37 | Sep 20th, 2017

Digital platforms have been well received by customers, but for workers, they often have a dark side. And they present a major challenge for governments who are grappling with how to regulate them.

Artificial intelligence, robots and the future of work, Part 1

54:35 | Sep 13th, 2017

AI and robots seem to be everywhere, handling more and more work, freeing humans up -- to do what? Contributor Jill Eisen takes a wide-angle lens to the digital revolution happening in our working lives. Part 1 of 3.

Generation Mars- Part Two

54:35 | Sep 1st, 2017

If we could go to the moon, we could go anywhere, right? Stephen Humphrey and a stellar crew of authors, astronauts and Mars scholars confront the hazards, risks and challenges of getting humans to Mars, and then of surviving and living on the Red P...Show More

The Return of History- Your Questions

54:33 | Aug 29th, 2017

The CBC Massey Lectures inspire a lot of provocative questions -- and thoughtful answers -- in each city on the tour. In this episode, you'll hear the best of those audience questions with a bonus: questions posed by our radio and online audiences.

The Challenge of Words

53:58 | Aug 28th, 2017

The novel -- an art form that's centuries old -- still has the capacity to hold our attention from subway commute to library chair. But what is the future of literary writing in our hyperfast, overcaffeinated, 140-character, social-media-blasted worl...Show More

Rear View Mirror

53:58 | Aug 21st, 2017

Has the future ever looked like the past? Sailing in the 21st century, perhaps we are in uncharted waters. A discussion from the Stratford Festival, featuring historian Margaret MacMillan, former politician Bob Rae and journalist Karin Wells.

The Challenge of Peace

53:58 | Aug 14th, 2017

We have the best communications in history, except for the kind that matters -- nations and states understanding each other. Jennifer Welsh, Paul Heinbecker, Peter Boehm, Arne Kislenko and Daniel Eayrs in conversation from the Stratford Festival.

How humankind is on the verge of transforming itself: Yuval Harari (Encore Oct 11, 2016)

53:59 | Jul 20th, 2017

In his book “Homo Deus”, Yuval Harari argues that humankind is on the verge of transforming itself: advances creating networked intelligences will surpass our own in speed, capability and impact. But where will this leave us?

Joseph Conrad, Prophet of a Global World

54:47 | Dec 17th

Seen from today, the novelist Joseph Conrad's early 20th century views on the world, particularly on race, can be offensive. But at the same time, his observations were deeply prescient of modern times. V.S. Naipaul, who was also a harsh critic, once...Show More

Tom Thomson: 100 Years from Now, Part 2

54:47 | Dec 14th

IDEAS contributor Sean Foley explores the landscapes of Algonquin Park, Ont., which inspired Tom Thomson's work - while also examining Indigenous artists' perspectives of the same landscapes that Thomson and the Group of Seven may have missed.

The People vs Democracy

54:47 | Dec 13th

Authoritarian populists have won elections across a large swath of western liberal democracies. Populist leaders have formed government through free and (mostly) fair elections by riding a wave of popular disaffection with the status quo. But once in...Show More

Award-winning Authors on Borders, Real and Imagined

54:47 | Dec 12th

Winners of the 2018 Governor General's Literary Awards address our challenge to create an original piece of writing on the theme of borders. In forms ranging from poetry to fiction and personal essay, they reflect on the idea of divisions, and on the...Show More

The Little Prince: The Child Philosopher

54:48 | Dec 11th

"And now here is my secret, a very simple secret: it is only with the heart that we see correctly; what is most important is invisible to the eye." The Little Prince was first published in 1943. And since then, it's sold 200 million copies, in 300 la...Show More

The Art of Leadership

54:26 | Dec 7th

What makes a good leader - someone with the ability to get others to follow, sometimes into the unknown? From the Stratford Festival, a discussion about leadership three successful (women) leaders: Chief Ava Hill from the Six Nations, Anita Gaffney, ...Show More

Talking with Doctor David Naylor: Winner of the 2018 Friesen Prize

54:26 | Dec 6th

Although he's not yet officially eligible to collect his pension, Dr. David Naylor is already President Emeritus of the University of Toronto - having occupied the office itself for eight turbulent years from 2005 - 2013. Before that, Naylor was Dean...Show More

The Jezebel Problem: What 'bossy' women should know about language

54:26 | Dec 5th

PhD graduate Laura Hare taught herself Biblical Hebrew so she could analyse male and female speech patterns in the original text of the Hebrew Bible (or Old Testament). She found the women characters consistently using language that shows deference t...Show More

Rethinking the Beaver: Why beavers and humans have to learn to get along

54:25 | Nov 28th

Four centuries of fur-trade trapping nearly wiped beavers off the North American map. Now they're back, big time, and we're discovering that sharing the landscape with such tenacious ecosystem engineers isn't always easy. We're also learning that the...Show More

Why Environmentalism is Failing

54:26 | Nov 23rd

Environmental problems are well-known and have been for decades, but we still appear to be edging towards a global catastrophe. Why? Environmentalist Graham Saul believes that part of the problem is environmentalism itself. He believes it has a messa...Show More

The Accommodating Space: A Hotel Check-In

54:26 | Nov 22nd

A guest checks into a Las Vegas hotel suite, and makes it a fortress, staging a mass shooting on the city below. It's a horrific act that seems to subvert the very ethos of hotels - places of hospitality and calm. Yet hotels contain multitudes. They ...Show More

Lecture 5: "We Are Not Going Anywhere" (2018 CBC Massey Lectures)

54:42 | Nov 16th

Prize-winning journalist Tanya Talaga (author of Seven Fallen Feathers) explores the legacy of cultural genocide against Indigenous peoples in her 2018 CBC Massey Lectures series, titled All Our Relations: Finding the Path Forward.

Lecture 4: "I Breathe For Them" (2018 CBC Massey Lectures)

54:42 | Nov 15th

Prize-winning journalist Tanya Talaga (author of Seven Fallen Feathers) explores the legacy of cultural genocide against Indigenous peoples in her 2018 CBC Massey Lectures series, titled All Our Relations: Finding the Path Forward.

Lecture 3: "The Third Space" (The 2018 CBC Massey Lectures)

54:42 | Nov 14th

Prize-winning journalist Tanya Talaga (author of Seven Fallen Feathers) explores the legacy of cultural genocide against Indigenous peoples in her 2018 CBC Massey Lectures series, titled All Our Relations: Finding the Path Forward.

Lecture 2: "Big Brother's Hunger" by Tanya Talaga (2018 CBC Massey Lectures)

54:42 | Nov 13th

In her 2018 CBC Massey Lectures series, titled All Our Relations: Finding the Path Forward, prize-winning journalist Tanya Talaga (author of Seven Fallen Feathers) explores the legacy of cultural genocide against Indigenous peoples.

Tom Thomson: 100 years from now

54:42 | Nov 9th

IDEAS contributor Sean Foley asks one central question: does the mortal and material fascination with Tom Thomson, leave us with something enduring - something to carry us through the next century, and beyond?

Lecture 1: "We Were Always Here" by Tanya Talaga (2018 CBC Massey Lectures)

54:42 | Nov 9th

In her 2018 CBC Massey Lectures series, titled All Our Relations: Finding the Path Forward, prize-winning journalist Tanya Talaga (author of Seven Fallen Feathers) explores the legacy of cultural genocide against Indigenous peoples. For Talaga, that ...Show More

Data for Social Good

54:42 | Nov 8th

We live in a glut of data. Individually we produce vast amounts of information about ourselves simply by living our lives: where we go, what we like, where we shop, our political views, which programs we watch. Each day we produce 2.5 quintillion byt...Show More

Travels through Trump's America (Encore January 19, 2018)

54:42 | Nov 6th

The U.S. midterms are yet another prompt for many Americans - and people around the world - to reflect on what America actually is now, politically, socially and culturally. Contributor David Zane Mairowitz is originally from New York, and has been l...Show More

The Enright Files: The state of American democracy in the age of Trump

54:43 | Nov 5th

The U.S. midterm elections have been billed as a referendum on the presidency of Donald Trump. And many think the elections will chart the future course of American democracy at a time when anger, xenophobia, chaos and bitter partisanship and polariz...Show More

The Long Arm of Ayn Rand: Why she still matters, Part 2

54:43 | Nov 2nd

The intelligentsia mocked her writings and lampooned her philosophy, which she called Objectivism. But Ayn Rand's books, especially her two major works, The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged, continue to sell millions of copies. There are Ayn Rand thin...Show More

Wilde Women in a Man's World

54:42 | Oct 16th

Irish-born Oscar Wilde was Britain's most famous playwright in the late 19th century. He was also famous, or infamous, for being gay. But the people who arguably had the most important influence on him and his work were women. From the Stratford Fest...Show More

The Life Course - trauma, migration and 'renoviction' in Vancouver

54:46 | Oct 9th

PhD student Mei Lan Fang's parents survived the Cultural Revolution and immigrated to Canada with dreams of settling in a country where human rights are protected and social mobility is possible. After years of financial struggle in Vancouver, the fa...Show More

Neil Turok on the invention of innovation

54:46 | Oct 8th

"Innovation is actually built into our DNA. It's who we are. It's what makes us different". This is the provocative thesis of Neil Turok, Director of Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics. Our true evolution he argues, is the result of trial an...Show More

Shaking the snow globe: Michael Pollan on the therapeutic use of psychedelic drugs

54:36 | Sep 25th

In his book "How to Change Your Mind", Michael Pollan explores how psychedelic drugs have been used to enhance spiritual experiences and treat many conditions from depression to anxiety. He speaks to IDEAS producer, Mary O'Connell.

The Bison and the "B"

54:39 | Sep 21st

It was a simple file folder, enigmatically labelled "B". But it was the key to learning how a small secret society of key scientists in the federal government in the 1920s, thwarted an ill-conceived plan to move Plains Bison into Wood Buffalo Nationa...Show More

Taming the Beast: Are violent urges part of men's nature? (Encore May 2, 2018)

54:53 | Sep 17th

How does a just society reconcile the desire for peace, with the desire, most often by men, for violence? How much does nature stir boys, men, to fight? And to what extent can they control that stirring? Author Daemon Fairless takes IDEAS producer Ma...Show More

Panpsychism and the Nature of Consciousness

55:01 | Sep 13th

What is consciousness? Why does it even exist? It has long been treated as the byproduct of biological complexity. The more complicated the brain, the more self-aware. Other thinkers have seen consciousness as totally distinct from the body -- dualis...Show More

The Restaurant: A Table Divided (Encore May 21,2018)

55:01 | Sep 12th

There's a lot more happening at a restaurant than simply ordering from a menu and getting your food. Restaurants are sites of self-expression - spaces in which status and distinction are performed and lines between class, race, and gender are reflect...Show More

Yuval Harari: Hacking Humanity

55:02 | Sep 5th

Yuval Harari is a global intellectual. And the internationally bestselling author is worried: our brains are getting hacked. Artificial intelligence, biotechnology and ever-sophisticated algorithms are tapping into our values, habits, tastes, desires...Show More

The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures: In Search of a Better World, Q&A (Encore April 2, 2018)

54:53 | Aug 30th

How can we fix our broken world? And what does it actually mean to love your neighbour? Those are some of the questions raised by Payam Akhavan in the 2017 CBC Massey Lectures - on air, and on tour. We also invited you, our listeners, to send us your...Show More

The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures: In Search of a Better World, Lecture 5 (Encore November 10, 2017)

54:55 | Aug 29th

In his final lecture, Payam Akhavan looks through the eyes of a suicide bomber to chart the rise of extremism and the decline of 'basic human dignity'. He concludes the series explaining how we can end hate and see how interconnected we all are.

It's Alive! - Frankenstein at 200 (Encore April 16, 2018)

54:54 | Aug 28th

In 1818, the world was introduced to an entirely new kind of monster. Mary Shelley published Frankenstein: or The Modern Prometheus and for two centuries her creation has stalked the stage, then the screen; inspired art, and filled the pages of count...Show More

Can we save Rosemary's Baby? (Encore March 15, 2018)

54:57 | Aug 27th

It's a horror classic from the 1960s that still unnerves us. It's influenced generations of filmmakers. It's part of the exclusive Criterion Collection of world cinema. And it turns 50 this year. But director Roman Polanski is a convicted rapist. Fil...Show More

Generation Mars, Part 2 (Encore October 27, 2016)

54:58 | Aug 23rd

The day might well be approaching when humans set foot on Mars. Stephen Humphrey and a crew of authors, astronauts and Mars scholars confront the hazards and challenges of getting humans to Mars, and then of surviving - and living - on the Red Planet...Show More

The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures: In Search of a Better World, Lecture 4 (Encore November 9, 2017)

54:56 | Aug 22nd

Payam Akhavan's fourth Massey Lecture focuses on how the world can move forward after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the implosion of Afghanistan and the deadly 9/11 terrorist attacks.

World on fire: What wildfires teach us about living in the forest and a challenging climate (Encore May 16, 2016)

55:17 | Aug 20th

They're bigger, faster and hotter than before, torching more of our world: wildfires, like those now ravaging British Columbia, the one that ripped through Fort McMurray in 2016, or through Slave Lake, Alberta in 2011, leveling a third of that commun...Show More

Fighting at the table: Conflict as successful integration (Encore June 29, 2017)

54:58 | Aug 17th

Sociologist Aladin El-Mafalaani sees anti-immigrant cries to build walls, and hate-fuelled politics counter-intuitively: a sign that integration is working. Conflict, he argues, is the necessary consequence of new arrivals at a metaphoric dinner tabl...Show More

Generation Mars, Part 1 (Encore October 20, 2016)

54:58 | Aug 16th

The day might well be approaching when humans set foot on Mars. Stephen Humphrey and a crew of authors, astronauts and Mars scholars confront the hazards and challenges of getting humans to Mars, and then of surviving - and living - on the Red Planet...Show More

The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures: In Search of a Better World, Lecture 3 (Encore Nov 9, 2017)

54:58 | Aug 15th

In his third Massey Lecture, Payam Akhavan revisits the genocide in Rwanda, talks about the work he did there, and what can be done to prevent such abuses from happening again.

Into the Gray Zone with neuroscientist Adrian Owen (Encore March 12, 2018)

54:56 | Aug 13th

We've usually thought that people in comas or 'vegetative' states are completely cut off from the world. But groundbreaking work shows that as much as 20 per cent of patients whose brains were considered non-responsive, turn out to be vibrantly alive...Show More

The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures: In Search of a Better World, Lecture 2 (Encore Nov 8, 2017)

54:58 | Aug 8th

In his second Massey Lecture, Payam Akhavan details just how hard it is to punish war criminals, recalling his time with the UN as a prosecutor at The Hague and on the streets of Sarajevo, among other conflict zones.

Less work and more leisure: Utopian visions and the future of work (Sept 27, 2018)

55:01 | Aug 7th

Technological change has always provoked both utopian and dystopian visions of the future. Part 3 of Jill Eisen's series on the future of work looks at the promise of technology - how it can lead to a world that's environmentally sustainable and one ...Show More

2017 CBC Massey Lectures: In Search of a Better World, Lecture 1 (Encore Nov 7, 2017)

54:52 | Aug 1st

In the first of his CBC Massey Lectures, human rights lawyer and scholar Payam Akhavan describes how fleeing Iran and watching his homeland from afar helped him discover human rights. This lecture is called "The Knowledge of Suffering".

Platform capitalism, digital technology and the future of work (Encore Sept. 20/17)

54:54 | Jul 31st

Digital platforms have been well received by customers, but for workers, they often have a dark side. And they present a major challenge for governments who are grappling with how to regulate them. Part 2 of a 3-part series.

Artificial intelligence, robots and the future of work (Encore Sept 13, 2017)

54:58 | Jul 24th

AI and robots seem to be everywhere, handling more and more work, freeing humans up -- to do what? Contributor Jill Eisen takes a wide-angle lens to the digital revolution happening in our working lives. What will happen when robots and algorithms s...Show More

Making a better world with a culture of 'citizen eaters' (Encore Dec 1, 2017)

54:58 | Jul 23rd

Michael S. Carolan is the author of No One Eats Alone: Food as a Social Enterprise. He gave a public talk in Toronto in the autumn of 2017, and made the following provocative argument: we can change our relationship to food - how's it's made, distrib...Show More

Pasta: The long and short of it (Encore September 3, 2010)

54:57 | Jul 18th

Pasta, a simple amalgam of wheat flour and water, is one of the world's most popular foods. It's Italy's gift to humanity? or maybe the Arabs', or China's. With its hundreds of shapes and sizes, its infinite variety of sauces, pasta is the foundation...Show More

Meat on the table: Can we justify consuming animals? (Encore October 27, 2017)

54:57 | Jul 17th

If you typically eat three meals a day, then it's a choice you make more than one thousand times a year. And if you're like most people, that choice probably involves meat or dairy, or both. On top of that, many of the clothes we wear are made from a...Show More

Master of his own design: Becoming Frank Gehry (Encore Oct 13, 2017)

54:56 | Jul 10th

Canadian-born Frank Gehry has been called the greatest architect of our time. And yet he's still a rebel in his field. His sensual, sculptural buildings reject the cold minimalism and glass boxes of Modernism, and the ornate flourishes of post-modern...Show More

Master of his own design: Conversations with Frank Gehry, rebel architect (Encore Oct 6, 2017)

54:58 | Jul 9th

Canadian-born Frank Gehry has been called the greatest architect of our time. And yet he's still a rebel in his field. His sensual, sculptural buildings reject the cold minimalism and glass boxes of Modernism, and the ornate flourishes of post-modern...Show More

Slavery's long shadow: The impact of 200 years enslavement in Canada

54:57 | Jul 5th

Is there a connection between the enslavement of African-Canadians and their overwhelming presence in the criminal justice system today? The United Nations has sounded the alarm on anti-black racism in Canada, stating it can be traced back to slavery...Show More

Overlooked: Photography and the Smartphone

54:42 | Jun 26th

Just over a decade ago, the iPhone was created, and its built-in camera soon sparked a photography revolution. We now use our smartphones to take an estimated 1.2 trillion images a year globally. We've gone from capturing "special" moments, to docume...Show More

Restoring our relationship with nature from lake beds to treetops

54:42 | Jun 25th

IDEAS host Paul Kennedy moderates the fifth Muskoka Summit on the Environment, a panel discussion about "Restoring our Relationship with the Natural World." Six guests join Kennedy in a discussion about the environment.

A Modest Proposal About Satire

54:42 | Jun 22nd

Political comedy is everywhere on TV, but contributor Peter Brown is concerned: the laughter on late-night shows seems to be giving way to the earnest partisan cheering that comedian Seth Meyers calls "clapter". Are our current politicians becoming s...Show More

One House Many Nations: Building tiny homes to solve a national crisis

54:42 | Jun 21st

n the Opaskwayak Cree Nation (or OCN), they've come up with their own home-grown solution to a national housing crisis. Paul Kennedy made a mid-winter visit to the reserve - situated at the junction of the Opasquia and Saskatchewan Rivers, in Norther...Show More

A Map of the Heart, Part 2: The Icelandic Sagas

54:42 | Jun 19th

More than a thousand years ago, rebel Vikings and other settlers fleeing from Norway settled on a craggy, uninhabited island in the north Atlantic: Iceland. There they built a new world pretty much from scratch, with a new legal system, a new social ...Show More

Culture Weaponized: Ali Velshi on shutting our mouths and opening our ears

54:42 | Jun 14th

Ali Velshi is a reporter, analyst, and self-identified "double immigrant". And he's worried about what he calls "the growing weaponization of culture." In a talk he gave at the Peter Wall Institute at the University of British Columbia, Velshi says i...Show More

A Map of the Heart: The Icelandic Sagas, Part 1

54:41 | Jun 12th

More than a thousand years ago, rebel Vikings and other settlers fleeing from Norway settled on a craggy, uninhabited island in the north Atlantic: Iceland. There they built a new world pretty much from scratch, with a new legal system, a new social ...Show More

A matter of life and death: Sue Gardner on public broadcasting

54:42 | Jun 11th

In a public talk at Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto, Sue Gardner argues that that we've returned to the same set of ominous social conditions which led to the creation of public broadcasting in the first place - and that now is the time to recommit to ...Show More

International perspectives on the 'idea of north'

54:43 | Jun 7th

From the Blue Metropolis/Metropole Bleu Festival in Montreal, Paul Kennedy discusses the 'idea of north' with writers from Quebec's Inuit North, Denmark and Norway. They compare and contrast the North as they know it, and how they express that throug...Show More

Shakespeare and Company

54:42 | Jun 6th

It's tempting to think only of Shakespeare when we think of the Elizabethan era - the late 1500s to early 1600s. But he was only one of many writers, and there was a whole other world of literature and ideas, and of artists thinking and writing about...Show More

The Enright Files: Conversations with some of Ireland's finest writers

54:42 | Jun 4th

If any nation punches above its weight in literature, it might be Ireland — a small island nation that has produced four Nobel Prize winners in literature and countless other poets, playwrights and novelists of international renown. On this month's e...Show More

A politically incorrect debate about political correctness (The Munk Debates)

54:35 | May 30th

Does 'political correctness' impede free speech, and blockade the exchange of ideas? Or does it create a better society by confronting the power imbalances that keep marginalized groups marginalized? In this Munk Debate, bestselling author Michael E...Show More

The Paris Riots of 1968, Part 3: A failed revolution that changed the world

54:34 | May 28th

Students taking to the streets to protest — it looked like a simple thing, fifty years ago in May 1968. But it proved to be the spark that started a conflagration. Thousands of demonstrators turned into hundreds of thousands, barricades were built, c...Show More

The Paris Riots, 1968, Part 1: A failed revolution that changed the world

54:34 | May 28th

It's been said that the "revolution" of 1968 failed, but it was a failure that changed the world. Philip Coulter went to Paris to talk to some of the people who were there on May 10 1968, the day of the first big demonstration. Part 1 of a 3-part ser...Show More

On the Move from Montreal: A profile of Little Burgundy

54:35 | May 25th

As part of ongoing IDEAS coverage of work-related mobility issues throughout Canada and around the world, Paul Kennedy profiles the Montreal neighbourhood of "Little Burgundy". For much of the 20th century, this vibrant, overwhelmingly black communit...Show More

Creating Conscience, Part 2: A history of treating the psychopath

54:35 | May 22nd

For decades psychiatry has been asking: what makes a psychopath? The list of possible explanations stretches back over centuries: demonic possession, trace metals in the body, bad mothering, violence on television, birth trauma. In Part 2 of this se...Show More

The Restaurant: A table divided

54:36 | May 22nd

There's a lot more happening at a restaurant than simply ordering from a menu and getting your food. Restaurants are sites of self-expression — spaces in which status and distinction are performed and lines between class, race, and gender are reflect...Show More

Enlightenment Now: Why Steven Pinker believes in progress

54:35 | May 18th

It may be tempting to think human civilization is on the verge of collapse: environmental degradation, the rise in authoritarianism, ballooning income disparities. But Harvard psychologist and linguist Steven Pinker is having none of it. He argues th...Show More

Creating Conscience, Part 1: A history of treating the psychopath

54:36 | May 15th

The mystery of the psychopath. A human riddle that has haunted and stumped us for centuries. Is the psychopath mad or just plain bad? Evil and beyond redemption, or potentially treatable? IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell explores these questions in thi...Show More

Starving out resistance: Anne Applebaum on Stalin’s deliberate famine in Ukraine

54:35 | May 8th

Paul Kennedy in conversation with historian Anne Applebaum, winner of the 2018 Lionel Gelber Prize. The journalist and academic won the prestigious nonfiction award for her book, "Red Famine". It tells the story of how Stalin's collective farming pol...Show More

May '68: A Tale of Four Cities

54:36 | May 3rd

The student-led protests of May 1968 on the streets of Paris dominated the news of the day and have since entered the realm of popular mythology. Contributor David Zane Mairowitz was there. He was, as he puts it, an observer-participant, documenting ...Show More

The hidden power of food: Finding value in what we eat (Encore November 23, 2017)

54:49 | Apr 20th

In Canada we waste about a third of the food we produce. And yet four million Canadians experience food insecurity. In partnership with the Arrell Food Institute at the University of Guelph, we hear from Dawn Morrison whose work focuses on Indigenous...Show More

Roaming Imagination: What the stories we tell about bears say about us (Encore November 22, 2017)

54:48 | Apr 20th

Bears hold a powerful place in the human psyche. From early cave drawings and myths as old as language itself, to modern scientific research, the family Ursidae has captivated the imaginations of humans around the world. At the heart of our obsession...Show More

Who are you? Five stories of how gender shapes identity

54:47 | Apr 17th

How does gender drive identity? And what do we mean by gender anyway? We live in an age of something far more fluid than the standard male/female dichotomy. It's not surprising many people are feeling confused. From The Stratford Festival, a discussi...Show More

It's Alive! - Frankenstein at 200

54:48 | Apr 16th

In 1818, the world was introduced to an entirely new kind of monster. Mary Shelley published Frankenstein: or The Modern Prometheus and for two centuries her creation has stalked the stage, then the screen; inspired art, and filled the pages of count...Show More

The Verdict on Sir John A. Macdonald: Guilty or innocent?

54:49 | Apr 12th

Part 2 of John A. Macdonald on Trial. As celebrations of Canada's 150th birthday continue to fade into the background, the controversy around Sir John A. Macdonald's legacy continues to build. This special episode of IDEAS puts Canada's first Prime M...Show More

Sir John A. Macdonald on trial for crimes against humanity, Part 1

54:49 | Apr 11th

He's seen as the father our nation. Without him, Confederation might never have happened. And as the celebrations of Canada's 150th birthday continue to fade into the background, the controversy around Sir John A. Macdonald's legacy continues to buil...Show More

How can we better understand our world & make it a better place?

54:45 | Apr 2nd

How can we fix our broken world? And what does it actually mean to love your neighbour? Just some of the questions raised by Payam Akhavan in the 2017 CBC Massey Lectures — on air, and on tour. We also invited you, our listeners, to send us your ques...Show More

Lecture 5 - The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures by Payam Akhavan (Encore Nov 10, 2017)

1:09:13 | Mar 30th

In the horrors of the Iraq war and the depredations of ISIS, basic human dignity collapsed: people did unimaginable things to each other, the abnormal became normal. And Payam Akhavan saw this human disease everywhere- Congo, Uganda, and here in Cana...Show More

Lecture 4 - The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures by Payam Akhavan (Encore Nov 9, 2017)

1:09:23 | Mar 29th

The collapse of the Soviet Union, the falling of the twin towers, and ultimately the implosion of Afghanistan, were momentous events that divided families, destroyed and created friendships, and showed the human spirit in its worst and best aspects. ...Show More

Lecture 3 - The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures by Payam Akhavan (Encore Nov 8, 2017)

1:04:29 | Mar 28th

In the 1990’s the world watched in horror as the Hutus of Rwanda massacred their neighbours, the Tutsis. There was no great will to intervene, but Payam Akhavan was part of the creation of the International Criminal Tribunal that might bring war crim...Show More

Lecture 2 - The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures by Payam Akhavan (Encore Nov 7, 2017)

1:03:52 | Mar 27th

At least as far back as the American Civil war, people were trying to figure out some rules for war. Right through the two world wars we were sorting out what seemed morally acceptable in international conflict. But by 1995, and the war in Bosnia, th...Show More

Lecture 1 - The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures by Payam Akhavan (Encore Nov 6, 2017)

1:01:48 | Mar 26th

Payam Akhavan tells the story of how, in the 1970’s, his family was forced to flee from the Iran of Ayatollah Khomeini. It was a time when the world realized that “democracy” wouldn’t naturally take root everywhere. A story of an awakening to human r...Show More

Alcohol: Tonic or Toxin?

54:47 | Mar 21st

As we move towards legalization of cannabis, we look at that other drug that many of us already have in our homes and use on a daily basis: alcohol. How did we start using it? How does it affect our health and society? And given the latest scientific...Show More

Beyond Words: Photographers of War

54:47 | Mar 20th

From the Civil War to Iraq, photographic images of conflict sear themselves onto our consciousness, and reside in a psychic space that lies beyond words. Yet we so rarely hear from the people who create the images of some of the most definitive event...Show More

Can we save Rosemary's Baby?

54:46 | Mar 15th

It's a horror classic from the 1960s that still unnerves us. It’s influenced generations of filmmakers. It's part of the exclusive Criterion Collection of world cinema. And it turns 50 this year. But director Roman Polanski is a convicted rapist. Fil...Show More

Good Cheer is a Great Idea!

54:39 | Feb 28th

Samuel de Champlain’s “L’Ordre de Bon Temps” kept early French colonists at Port Royal, Nova Scotia alive through the brutal winter of 1606. Recently, Paul Kennedy invited Chef Michael Smith from the famous Inn at Bay Fortune, near Souris, Prince Edw...Show More

The resistance of Black Canada: State surveillance and suppression

54:40 | Feb 27th

Canada's history of suppressing Black activism is coming to light like never before, thanks to researchers like PhD student Wendell Adjetey. Wendell's historical research uncovers evidence of clandestine government surveillance in the 20th century, w...Show More

A book lover, his library and the Scottish Enlightenment

54:40 | Feb 22nd

An Edinburgh bibliophile takes Paul Kennedy through his library of amazing books that were published in Scotland in the late 18th century, during the heyday of the Scottish Enlightenment. At the time, Adam Smith, David Hume, James Boswell and The Enc...Show More

The Illusion of Money, Part 2 (Encore February 25, 2016)

54:40 | Feb 21st

We think we know what money is. We use it every day and our lives are unimaginable without it. But look more closely and you find that coins and dollar bills aren't "real". They're promises, symbols, ideas. And exactly what money is has evolved enorm...Show More

Less work and more leisure: Utopian visions and the future of work (Encore Sept 27, 2017)

54:40 | Feb 21st

Technology was once believed to be our deliverance. We'd be working shorter hours, and about the only stress we'd have would be to figure out what to do with all our leisure time. But technology hasn't quite delivered on that promise. We're working l...Show More

Gabrielle Scrimshaw on liberating the past and embracing the future

54:39 | Feb 16th

Gabrielle Scrimshaw delivers the third annual Vancouver Island University Indigenous Lecture on the challenges Indigenous youth face, what reconciliation looks like, and how people can engage on that journey.

Whose Lives Matter?

54:38 | Feb 15th

Why does the colour of someone's skin seems to trigger prejudice? Why do black people get carded by the police more often than white? Why does Black history seem marginalized in the story of our country? The Black Lives Matter movement demands seriou...Show More

Decoding the resistance to climate change: Are we doomed? (Encore September 14, 2017)

54:40 | Feb 9th

Global warming is "fake news", or a "Chinese hoax". So says a richly funded conservative movement that's become a world-wide campaign. In her book, "The Merchants of Doubt", Harvard historian of science Naomi Oreskes traces how this propaganda war st...Show More

Platform capitalism, digital technology and the future of work (Part 2, Encore Sept 20, 2018)

54:39 | Feb 6th

Digital platforms have been well received by customers, but for workers, they often have a dark side. And they present a major challenge for governments who are grappling with how to regulate them. Part 2 of a 3-part series.

Are We F--ked? Decoding the resistance to climate change (Encore September 7, 2017)

54:39 | Feb 2nd

The evidence is everywhere: forests retreating, glaciers melting, sea levels rising. Droughts, floods, wildfires and storms have increased five-fold over the past 50 years. And we’re only just beginning to feel the strain of climate change. It's esti...Show More

Physicist Neil Turok explains the ultimate simplicity of everything

54:39 | Feb 1st

Some physicists now claim that we may have reached the end of what physics can discover about the origins and structure of the universe. Neil Turok is definitely not one of them. The director of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics believe...Show More

Writer Heather O'Neill finds wisdom in her father's eccentric life advice

54:39 | Jan 31st

Acclaimed writer Heather O'Neill's father was a janitor, but listed his occupation as professor of philosophy, and he offered a series of unusual rules for life as she grew up in Montreal. In her Henry Kreisel Lecture at the Canadian Literature Cent...Show More

Andrew Feinstein exposes "the shadow world" of global arms

54:39 | Jan 29th

In a UBC Wall Exchange talk from Vancouver, former South African politician and current U.K. corruption researcher Andrew Feinstein argues that the arms trade does not make us more secure. In fact, he contends that it fuels conflict, undermines econo...Show More

When Scotland saved the world

54:40 | Jan 25th

Approximately 250 years ago, the windswept and unwelcoming capital of a Edinburgh became a beacon of intelligence for the entire world. Paul Kennedy walks up and down 'The Royal Mile', and through the planned streets and elegant squares of Edinburgh'...Show More

Ursula Johnson: A new rock star in the art world

54:39 | Jan 24th

There's a lot of buzz around the 2017 Sobey Art Award winner Ursula Johnson — a brilliant, dynamic, articulate and delightful Mi'kmaq artist from Eskasoni First Nation, in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. Her art is stunning and thought-provoking. She is a ...Show More

Wade Davis: Light at the edge of the world

54:38 | Jan 23rd

Wade Davis thinks we need to pay more attention to the values, the voices, and the concerns of Indigenous peoples. We have a lot to learn by listening more carefully. Wade Davis in a discussion with Paul Kennedy, with excerpts from a lecture at the O...Show More

Canada's original promise: Still waiting to be realized (Encore June 30, 2017)

54:39 | Jan 17th

Indigenous education advocate Roberta Jamieson believes Canada is at a make-or-break moment where it has a chance to recast its historically troubled relationship with First Nations for the next 150 years.

Making art that matters: The 2017 Sobey Art Awards

54:40 | Jan 17th

Artists are, in many ways, our cultural seers. At the core of great art is the grappling with profound issues and ideas facing society. Paul Kennedy talks to the the finalists of the prestigious 2017 Sobey Art Award — this country’s preeminent contem...Show More

First Nation, Second Nation: A discussion about the state of Indigenous people in Canada today

54:38 | Jan 16th

Canadians like to pretend that Indigenous peoples have some special place, that they shape our society in some significant way, but history -- as well as contemporary actions and attitudes -- might suggest otherwise. In a country where just about all...Show More

Decoding pre-historic art with Jean Clottes

54:39 | Jan 15th

Neil Sandell introduces us to the French archaeologist Jean Clottes, a man who's devoted his lifetime trying to decipher the rich, enigmatic world of cave art.

What happens when we stop asking questions: Why India must be secular (Encore June 28, 2017)

54:39 | Jan 12th

Political scientist Neera Chandhoke makes a heartfelt argument for a secular India. Against the growing tide of Hindu nationalism and India's history of inter-religious strife, she draws on Western and Indian thinkers to make the case for diversity.

Fighting at the table: Conflict as successful integration (Encore June 29, 2017)

54:40 | Jan 12th

Sociologist Aladin El-Mafalaani sees anti-immigrant cries to build walls, and hate-fuelled politics counter-intuitively: a sign that integration is working. Conflict, he argues, is the necessary consequence of new arrivals at a metaphoric dinner tabl...Show More

Canada's original promise: Still waiting to be realize (Encore June 30, 2017)

54:39 | Jan 12th

Mohawk education advocate Roberta Jamieson believes Canada is at a make-or-break historical moment where it has a chance to recast its historically toxic relationship with First Nations for the next 150 years.

Eyes on the back of our head: Recovering a multicultural South Africa (Encore June 26, 2017)

54:40 | Jan 9th

Msimang Sisonke pulls down the old binarism of black vs white to make way for a truly multicultural South Africa, one that welcomes other African migrants as it embraces its own racially diverse past.

Changing the Idea of Hockey

54:40 | Jan 5th

Game Change, the book written by NHL legend, Ken Dryden, is on one level about the increasing number of concussions hockey players have. But it's also about changing the way decision-makers make decisions.

First Nations in the first person: Telling stories & changing lives

54:39 | Jan 4th

Three Indigenous people, Sandra Henry, Theodore Fontaine, and Brielle Beardy Linklater tell their personal stories about struggle and resilience.

Words About War

54:39 | Dec 29th, 2017

BBC foreign correspondent Lyse Doucet presents a lecture about war journalism, and responds to questions from Paul Kennedy, in front of a live audience at the National War Museum in Ottawa.

Sailing Alone Around the World (Encore April 8, 2013)

54:43 | Dec 26th, 2017

Fewer than 200 people have sailed alone around the world and two of them are also Canadian. Philip Coulter explores this greatest challenge sailors set for themselves — possibly the greatest of all human challenges.

Return to North: The Soundscapes of Glenn Gould

54:42 | Dec 21st, 2017

Glenn Gould's landmark documentary, The Idea of North, first aired on IDEAS fifty years ago. Mark Laurie adopts Gould's contrapuntal technique to explore the landscape of Gould's life — and his ideas about music and radio.

Shakespeare in the funny papers

54:41 | Dec 20th, 2017

What if Shakespeare's characters escaped from the play that they're in and went off on a grand adventure of their own, freed from the chains of their creators imagination? A Stratford Festival panel discussion with Mya Gosling and Conor McCreery.

Journalism in the age of fake news

54:43 | Dec 18th, 2017

In panel discussions at the Banff Centre, part of The Democracy Project, journalists ponder reporting in an age where political leaders attack them to discredit their work.

How to Save an Island: Film-makers and fishers in Fogo

54:42 | Dec 14th, 2017

Fifty years ago the residents of Fogo Island were ordered to abandon their homes and resettle elsewhere in Newfoundland. At the end of what is now called The Fogo Process, they voted to stay put, form a cooperative, and take over the fish plant.

Borges' Buenos Aires: The Imaginary City, Part 2

54:41 | Dec 13th, 2017

The Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges was profoundly shaped by the city he grew up in — Buenos Aires. Philip Coulter goes on a walking tour of Borges' Buenos Aires in the company of the celebrated writer Alberto Manguel.

Conservative with age: Why your political stripes change over time

54:43 | Dec 11th, 2017

Many of us become more conservative as the years pass. Producer Peter Mitton explores why this tendency exists, and what it says about the way we acquire our political beliefs.

Award-winning authors on balancing chaos and control

54:42 | Dec 7th, 2017

A parent's fear. A child coping. The final stops of life. Winners of the 2017 Governor General's Literary Awards write on the theme of "chaos and control", and talk about where their imaginations travelled in the process.

Borges' Buenos Aires: The Imaginary City, Part 1

54:41 | Dec 6th, 2017

The Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges was profoundly shaped by the city he grew up in — Buenos Aires. Philip Coulter goes on a walking tour of Borges' Buenos Aires in the company of the celebrated writer Alberto Manguel.

Precarious Work: David Weil on the disappearing company job

54:43 | Dec 6th, 2017

For most of the 20th century, everyone, from the janitor on up to the CEO, was employed by the company. But now large corporations are outsourcing work to small companies. A lecture and interview with scholar and former Obama appointee David Weil.

The Enright Files on changing the way we think about the natural world

54:42 | Dec 4th, 2017

Michael Enright speaks to three people who are changing the way we think about our relationship with the natural world, from one-on-one relationships with animals to the massive, unwieldy issue of our impact on a geological scale.

Making a better world with a culture of 'citizen eaters'

54:47 | Dec 1st, 2017

Michael S. Carolan author of No One Eats Alone: Food as a Social Enterprise in conversation with Paul Kennedy about how we can use the power of food to build a healthier food system and a healthier society.

How Martin Luther invented the modern world

54:46 | Nov 29th, 2017

It has been 500 years since Martin Luther supposedly nailed his 95 theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany. A look at Martin Luther's legacy, and why he still evokes impassioned debate today.

Why democracy depends on how we talk to each other: Michael Sandel

54:46 | Nov 28th, 2017

Does Democracy Have a Future? Moral and Political Argument in the Age of Trump. Harvard University political philosopher Michael Sandel delivers the 2017 LaFontaine-Baldwin lecture.

The hidden power of food: Finding value in what we eat

54:46 | Nov 23rd, 2017

In Canada we waste about a third of the food we produce. Yet four million Canadians experience food insecurity. In partnership with the Arrell Food Institute at the University of Guelph, a look at the food systems and sustainability.

Roaming imagination: What the stories we tell about bears say about us

54:45 | Nov 22nd, 2017

Bears hold a powerful place in the human psyche. At the heart of our obsession are contradictions: a magnetism that draws us in and fear that pushes us away. Molly Segal explores the stories we share about bears, what they say about us and our future...Show More

Making the Team with 2017 Friesen Prize winner Dr. Alan Bernstein

54:46 | Nov 17th, 2017

2017 Friesen Prize winner Dr. Alan Bernstein talks with Paul Kennedy about his contributions to Canadian Medicine and advanced research. He continues to encourage and develop the spirit of teamwork that has characterized his entire career.

Confronting the 'perfect storm': How to feed the future

54:46 | Nov 16th, 2017

We're facing what could be a devastating crisis—how to feed ourselves without destroying the ecosystems we depend on. In partnership with the Arrell Food Institute at the University of Guelph we seek out creative solutions to a looming disaster.

Naked in the Mirror: Stephen Greenblatt on our obsession with Adam & Eve

54:45 | Nov 15th, 2017

Paul Kennedy discovers why the story of Adam and Eve has resonated with religious and secular minds alike, as he speaks to Stephen Greenblatt, author of “The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve.”

The 2016 U.S. ELECTION: We had no idea it would be like this

54:45 | Nov 13th, 2017

When Hillary Clinton announced that she would run for President, everyone knew the 2016 United States election could be a historic one. We had no idea how historic or unprecedented this election would become.

Lecture 4: "In Search of a Better World" (The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures)

1:09:22 | Nov 9th, 2017

A call to action for our times, Payam Akhavan's 2017 CBC Massey Lectures is a powerful survey of some of the major human rights struggles of our times. Lecture 4, "The Oneness of Humankind", was recorded in front of an audience in St. John's, Nfld.

Lecture 3: "In Search of a Better World" by Payam Akhavan (2017 CBC Massey Lectures)

1:04:28 | Nov 8th, 2017

A call to action for our times, Payam Akhavan's 2017 CBC Massey Lectures is a powerful survey of some of the major human rights struggles of our times. Lecture 3, "The Will to Intervene", was recorded in front of an audience in Montreal, Quebec.

Lecture 2: "In Search of a Better World" by Payam Akhavan (2017 CBC Massey Lectures)

1:03:51 | Nov 7th, 2017

A call to action for our times, Payam Akhavan's 2017 CBC Massey Lectures is a powerful survey of some of the major human rights struggles of our times. Lecture 2, "In Pursuit of Global Justice", was recorded in front of an audience in Vancouver, Br...Show More

Sex, Truth and Audio Tape, Part 2: What does consent really mean?

54:47 | Nov 1st, 2017

The Harvey Weinstein story has unleashed a veritable tsunami of sexual assault and harassment claims. And there's a huge gender gap at work: overwhelmingly, men are the accused perpetrators; women, the victims. Part 2 of a 2-part series.

Creating a city for all: The future of cities in the 21st century

54:44 | Oct 31st, 2017

Cities still drive social progress, but many factors are changing our modern world, and cities are again being forced to retool and rethink how they work. A discussion from the Stratford Festival.

Meat on the table: Can we justify consuming animals?

54:46 | Oct 27th, 2017

Gary Francione a staunch opponent of meat production and consumption debates cattle rancher and vegetarian Nicolette Hahn Niman on the ethics of consuming animals.

Sex, Truth and Audio Tape: Shifting identities on a changing sexual landscape

54:46 | Oct 25th, 2017

What are we to make of today's sexual landscape, where we see the most diverse range of orientations and expressions of sexuality in history? Part 1 of a 2-part series.

Master of his own design: Frank Gehry, rebel architect (Part 1)

54:46 | Oct 25th, 2017

Canadian-born Frank Gehry has been called the greatest architect of our time. And yet he's still a rebel in his field. IDEAS producer Mary Lynk a rare chance to talk with him in California. Part 1 of a 2-part series.

Master of his own design: Becoming Frank Gehry (Part 2)

54:45 | Oct 25th, 2017

Canadian-born Frank Gehry has been called the greatest architect of our time. And yet he's still a rebel in his field. IDEAS producer Mary Lynk a rare chance to talk with him in California. Part 2 of a 2-part series.

Dark tower of dreams: Inside the Walled City of Kowloon

54:45 | Oct 18th, 2017

The infamous "Walled City of Kowloon" was once the most populous spot on the planet. With 1.2 million people per square kilometre, it was a gigantic squatter's village. Paul Kennedy speaks with photographer Greg Girard, and urban designer Suenn Ho.

The edge of musical thinking: Capturing the spirit of tango and vibrato

54:46 | Oct 16th, 2017

There's a purity to music. It takes us into its own world, far removed from frustrations and challenges of daily life. But hidden within those innocent-sounding musical flourishes, there often lies a history of passionate disagreement.

Bread: Salvation or Damnation? (Encore April 14, 2017)

54:46 | Oct 13th, 2017

Bread is life. But for some, it represents a wrong turn in our species' evolution. Through conversation with bakers, religious leaders, historians and bread aficionados, producer Veronica Simmonds asks whether bread has led us to salvation or damnati...Show More

Conversations with Frank Gehry: Rebel Architect

54:46 | Oct 6th, 2017

Canadian-born Frank Gehry has been called the greatest architect of our time. And yet he's still a rebel in his field. IDEAS producer Mary Lynk a rare chance to talk with him in California. Part 1 of a 2-part series.

Gun Crazy: How fetishizing guns shuts down debate about them (Encore January 7, 2016)

54:47 | Oct 2nd, 2017

Columbine. Sandy Hook. Orlando. Now Las Vegas: the biggest mass shooting in the history of the United States. The stories seem to follow a pattern: shock, outrage, calls for gun control and rehearsed defences of the status quo, with very little chan...Show More

Undoing Forever: The implications of de-extinction (Encore June 19, 2014)

54:37 | Sep 29th, 2017

In labs around the world, scientists -- using the latest biotechnology -- are trying to bring extinct animals back to life. Britt Wray delves into the science, the ethics, and the implications of de-extinction for all animals, including us humans.

Savign Syria: Keeping war-torn culture alive (Encore March 24, 2017)

54:36 | Sep 28th, 2017

Destruction and displacement -- that's the story of Syria today. Paul Kennedy talks with three Syrians who believe in other Syrias, with stories about love, and laughter, and smell of jasmine and tarragon

Expletive Repeated: Why swearing matters (Encore March 16, 2017)

54:36 | Sep 25th, 2017

Profanity was once considered rude and crude -- a linguistic last resort. Not so these days. Younger generations use swearing as everyday slang, and academics study it as an ever-evolving form of creative and cultural expression.

Decolonization: The Next 150 on Indigenous Lands

54:36 | Sep 19th, 2017

Three Indigenous PhD students (Réal Carrière , Keri Cheechoo and Cherry Smiley) share their insights at a public forum hosted at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The theme: “The Next 150, on Indigenous Lands.”

Decoding the resistance to climate change: Are we doomed?

54:35 | Sep 14th, 2017

Global warming is "Fake News", a "Chinese Hoax". So says a richly funded Conservative movement that's become a world-wide campaign. In her book, "The Merchants of Doubt", Naomi Oreskes traces how this propaganda war started and how to fight it.

Autonomy: The unexpected implications of self-driving vehicles

54:35 | Sep 12th, 2017

We're racing down the highway to autonomous cars, whether it takes 10, 20 or 30 years. But what happens to our economy, the shape of our cities, and even our century-old car-centric culture once the vehicles arrive?

The Politics of the Professoriat: Political diversity on campus

52:53 | Sep 8th, 2017

Universities are supposed to be dedicated to the exchange of ideas. But according to social psychologist Jonathan Haidt, campuses now skew so far to the left that they’ve become “political monocultures” .

Are We F--ked? Decoding the resistance to climate change

54:35 | Sep 7th, 2017

The evidence is everywhere: forests retreating, glaciers melting, sea levels rising. And we're only just beginning to feel the strain of climate change. Despite all of these dire events and projections, the attacks continue — on climate scientists.

The art of crime fiction & what it says about human nature

54:35 | Sep 5th, 2017

Murder mysteries are conventionally thought of as staples of beach and cottage reading – not particularly taxing on the intellect. But that belies the depth and variety of crime writing today, as well as its ubiquity in both pop and literary culture.

How opening our ears can open our minds: Hildegard Westerkamp

54:35 | Aug 31st, 2017

"To be in the present as a listener is a revolutionary act. We absolutely need it, to be grounded in that way." Soundscape composer Hildegard Westerkamp hears the world differently than most people.

The Orwell Tapes- Part Three

54:35 | Aug 30th, 2017

His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us 'big brother', 'thoughtcrime', 'doublethink', whose name looms so large in this era of mass surveillance?

Generation Mars- Part One

54:00 | Aug 25th, 2017

The day might well be approaching when humans set foot on Mars. We'll be driven by a desire to find life -- or what remains of it -- and to colonize the planet.

The Orwell Tapes- Part Two

54:00 | Aug 23rd, 2017

"Asleep or awake, working or eating, indoors or out of doors, in the bath or in bed — no escape, 'Big Brother is watching you.'" George Orwell, 1984 Who was the man who gave us 'big brother', 'thoughtcrime', 'doublethink'?

The Marriage of True Minds, Part Two

54:00 | Aug 18th, 2017

Can marriage be a source of inspiration, creativity, mutual influence, and intellectual support? From Abelard and Heloise, to Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, a picture emerges of married men and women who inspire one another in life and love...Show More

The Orwell Tapes - Part One

53:59 | Aug 16th, 2017

His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us 'big brother', 'thoughtcrime', 'doublethink'? Steve Wadhams delves into recordings he made with the people who knew Orwell from his earliest days to his final moments...Show More

Is that all there is? Exploring the meaning & future of science (Encore Nov 25, 2016)

53:58 | Aug 7th, 2017

Science helps us understand ourselves and our own place in the cosmos. But how far does the math take us, and what do science and the humanities tell us when we look at the same questions from different points of view?

Undoing Linguicide: The legal right to the survival of Indigenous languages (Encore Apr 8, 2016)

54:01 | Aug 1st, 2017

Lorena Fontaine is completing her PhD at the University of Manitoba and is battling to revive aboriginal languages. She argues that Canadian indigenous communities have a legal right to the survival of language.

World on Fire (Encore May 16, 2016)

53:59 | Jul 26th, 2017

Adrienne Lamb explores the factors altering how we have to live with wildfire. New technology and new ways to think about fire and its behaviour could save lives.

The Dangerous Game: Gamergate and the "alt-right" (Encore Nov 30, 2016)

54:00 | Jul 25th, 2017

As a teen and then in her 20s, Emma Vosen loved gaming. Now as a PhD candidate, she looks to gamer culture as a microcosm of how sexism is seeded and replicated within broader society.

All in the family: Understanding and healing childhood trauma

54:00 | Jul 21st, 2017

Trauma is not a story about the past -- it lives in the present: in both the mind and body. Left untreated, it has no expiration date, whether it's trauma arising from childhood abuse or PTSD suffered as an adult.

The Post-Modern Chimpanzee's Guide to Parenting (Encore Oct 6, 2016)

54:00 | Jul 17th, 2017

A look at the work of evolutionary anthropologist and University of Toronto PhD student Iulia Badescu who spent a year camped out in a Ugandan jungle to observe chimp parenting.

Tocqueville's America Revisited, Part 1 (Encore October 14,2016)

54:00 | Jul 12th, 2017

Nearly 200 years ago, Alexis de Tocqueville travelled the United States trying to understand its strengths and weaknesses. Less than a month before Americans go to the polls, Paul Kennedy considers the ongoing relevance of Tocqueville's observations.

The shadow of charm city: Inside America's great racial divide (Encore Oct 24, 2016)

54:00 | Jul 12th, 2017

In a bid to instill civic pride forty years ago, Baltimore was officially named "Charm City". Today, some call Baltimore a war zone -over 300 homicides per year amid 16,000 vacant homes. Mary O'Connell takes us inside America's great racial divide.

Return of the Michif Boy: Confronting Métis trauma (Encore March 23, 2017)

53:35 | Jul 12th, 2017

By reconnecting with his birth mother PhD student Jesse Thistle came to understand the effects of intergenerational trauma. His award-winning research shines a light on the struggles and the resilience of Métis communities in northern Saskatchewan.

The Open Mind: Are 'unconscious' patients more conscious than we think? (Encore May 4, 2016)

53:59 | Jul 12th, 2017

Philosophy PhD student Andrew Peterson is embedded with scientists at the Brain and Mind Institute at Western University and considers the ethical and moral questions emerging from this cutting edge research.

Tocqueville's America Revisited, Part 2 (Encore October 21, 2016)

54:01 | Jul 12th, 2017

Nearly 200 years ago, Alexis de Tocqueville travelled the United States trying to understand its strengths and weaknesses. Less than a month before Americans go to the polls, Paul Kennedy considers the ongoing relevance of Tocqueville's observations.

Cracking our moral code: How we decide what's right and wrong (Encore Dec 16, 2016)

54:00 | Jul 12th, 2017

Producer John Chipman explores why some people stick to their moral codes more stringently than others, and delves into the latest neuroimaging research to find out what it can tell us about what guides our moral decisions.

​Canada's original promise: Still waiting to be realize

54:00 | Jun 30th, 2017

Mohawk education advocate Roberta Jamieson believes Canada is at a make-or-break historical moment where it has a chance to recast its historically toxic relationship with First Nations for the next 150 years.

Fighting at the table: Conflict as successful integration

54:00 | Jun 29th, 2017

Sociologist Aladin El-Mafalaani sees anti-immigrant cries to build walls, and hate-fuelled politics counter-intuitively: a sign that integration is working. Conflict, he argues, is the necessary consequence of new arrivals at a metaphoric dinner tabl...Show More

What happens when we stop asking questions: Why India must be secular

54:00 | Jun 28th, 2017

Political scientist Neera Chandhoke makes a heartfelt argument for a secular India. Against the growing tide of Hindu nationalism and India's history of inter-religious strife, she draws on Western and Indian thinkers to make the case for diversity.

The New Tribe of Israel: The immigrant underclass

54:00 | Jun 27th, 2017

Anthrolopogist Galia Sabar has devoted her professional life to what she calls the new tribe of Israel: Jewish-African and non-Jewish labour migrants, asylum seekers, and refugees.

Eyes on the back of our head: Recovering a multicultural South Africa

54:00 | Jun 26th, 2017

Msimang Sisonke pulls down the old binarism of black vs white to make way for a truly multicultural South Africa, one that welcomes other African migrants as it embraces its own racially diverse past.

Cree academic and novelist Tracey Lindberg on reconciliation before reconciliation (Encore Jan 28, 2017)

53:59 | Jun 22nd, 2017

Dr. Tracey Lindberg explores the importance of reconciliation with self, with community, and with Indigenous peoples in advance of reconciliation with Canada.

Policing: Old cops, new expectations

53:59 | Jun 22nd, 2017

Counter-terrorism, fighting cybercrime, policing highly diverse societies: Can the police do it all? Should the police do it all? Do the police want to do it all? A panel discussion about what it means to police and be policed today.

Go with the flow: Using nature to help fight climate change

53:59 | Jun 20th, 2017

Our climate is changing and because of it, our oceans and rivers are rising. In the past, we used large, manmade infrastructure to keep the water at bay. But maybe instead of trying to fight off nature, we should start working with it instead.

Building Tension: Preserving the past and constructing the future

54:00 | Jun 19th, 2017

Across Canada, our city cores are becoming indistinguishable jumbles of tall glass buildings - new and shiny always seems to beat heritage or repurposing. Four prominent architects discuss ways to tear down the edifices of modern planning and design.

Policing, Part 1: To serve or protect?

54:00 | Jun 15th, 2017

Relations between the public and the police are strained today: from charges of police violence, abuse and racial bias to calls for transparency and greater police accountability. A panel discussion about what it means to police and be policed today...Show More

Distant Future Warnings

54:00 | Jun 14th, 2017

Radioactive waste and toxic mining byproducts will remain deadly for thousands of years – maybe forever. Deep in the arsenic-contaminated underground at Giant Mine near Yellowknife, contributor Garth Mullins wonders how we can warn the distant future...Show More

Newfoundland Jam: Shakespeare's "As You Like It" on the 'Rock'

53:58 | Jun 13th, 2017

What happens when you set Shakespeare’s “As You Like It” in Newfoundland -- as they did at the Stratford Festival last year -- with the appropriate accents and a kitchen party?

Lady and Lord Macbeth on trial: guilty or bewitched?

53:58 | Jun 12th, 2017

Shakespeare's play tells us all about how Lord and Lady Macbeth plotted the killing of their king, Duncan. They killed him, that's for sure, but was it murder? You and I might say, guilty but a lawyer might say — not so fast: they were bewitched!

Orchids: A Love Story

54:00 | Jun 9th, 2017

Suggestive, romantic, sexy orchids! It turns out they're even sexier in their own world. Wily, deceptive, manipulating: get ready to travel between history and science, how we humans think about orchids and who they really are in nature among themsel...Show More

Pushing the Frontiers of Knowledge: The 2017 Killam Prize

54:00 | Jun 8th, 2017

Once a year, the Canada Council Killam Prize is bestowed on five of Canada's top academics in five different fields. Paul Kennedy interviews this year's winners and finds out what inspires them to break new ground.

Fail Better: What baseball can teach us about failure and community

54:00 | Jun 7th, 2017

Writers seem to be more attracted to baseball than to any other sport, but philosopher Mark Kingwell recently published the first book-length philosophical consideration of what has long been called America's national pastime.

The Challenge of Words: What's to become of serious writing in the digital age?

53:58 | Jun 6th, 2017

The novel -- an art form that's centuries old -- still has the capacity to hold our attention from subway commute to library chair. But we tell ourselves we're in a different era now. What's to become of serious writing in our hyperfast, overcaffeina...Show More

Subversive thoughts for an infantile age: Susan Neiman (Encore Oct 28, 2015)

53:58 | Jun 5th, 2017

In her book Why Grow Up? Subversive Thoughts for an Infantile Age, Paul Kennedy talks with philosopher Susan Neiman, who believes that "Having created societies that our young want to grow up into, we idealize the stages of youth."

After Guantanamo: Dennis Edney on defending Omar Khadr

53:58 | May 31st, 2017

From the Stratford Festival, Dennis Edney, Omar Khadr’s lawyer, talks with Paul Kennedy about a life-changing experience that contains a challenge for us all.

Nine Minutes That Changed The World

54:00 | May 31st, 2017

In 1876, the poet Stephane Mallarme published a poem entitled The Afternoon of a Faun. He doubted anyone could set it to music successfully. But composer Claude Debussy did exactly that. A look at the magic of Debussy's imagining.

Bringing up furbaby: The evolution from family pet to pet family

53:59 | May 30th, 2017

There are now more pets than children in North American homes, and lavish dog beds and catnip mice are taking the place of bassinets and rattles. Kelley Jo Burke explores what we're really saying about who we are when we start bringing up 'furbabies

Writing in Worried Times: GG Award winners share their anxieties (Encore Dec 13, 2016)

53:59 | May 29th, 2017

They may be successful writers, but that doesn't mean the 2016 Governor General's Literary Award winners are immune from worry about the world around us. Authors share some brand new work on that theme.

History Derailed: Understanding the Messy Middle East

54:00 | May 29th, 2017

American journalist Robert F. Worth joins Paul Kennedy in conversation about his book, A Rage for Order: The Middle East in Turmoil, from Tahrir Square to ISIS. Worth is this year's winner of the Lionel Gelber Prize.

Does public broadcasting have a future?

54:00 | May 26th, 2017

A panel discussion on the challenges faced by public broadcaster with James Harding from the BBC; Jennifer McGuire from the CBC and Michael Oreskes from NPR. Simon Houpt moderates the conversation.

Yes and No: The problem of bad referendums

54:00 | May 22nd, 2017

Leah Trueblood is a PhD student at Oxford University. She warns that ill-conceived referendums are actually dangerous for democracies. The latest episode in our series Ideas from the Trenches

The Myth of Victory

53:58 | May 19th, 2017

How do we know when we've won? Some people argue that World War I was just the opening act for the World War II, and perhaps World War III is just around the corner. Stephen Toope, Janice Stein and Hugh Segal in conversation.

How Art Shapes History

54:00 | May 18th, 2017

A panel discussion with architect Sir David Adjaye, visual artist Christi Belcourt, author Junot Díaz and filmmaker Paul Gross. Their focus: current global politics and how art shapes our understanding of place, history and progress.

Why Buffyworld still matters

53:58 | May 17th, 2017

It's been 20 years since a midriff-baring California cheerleader leapt onto our television screens and became a riveting woman warrior. Buffy the Vampire Slayer remains the most-studied show in television history. A look at the legacy of "Buffyworld"...Show More

Decoding Death: The science and significance of near death experiences

54:00 | May 17th, 2017

The nature of "near death experiences", or NDE's has historically been the territory of religion and philosophy. But now science has staked its claim in the discussion. Ashley Walters explores the science and the meaning of near death experiences.

The Self-Taught Philosopher: How a 900-year-old Arabic Tale Inspired the Enlightenment

53:59 | May 16th, 2017

Naheed Mustafa tells the story of philosopher-physician Ibn Tufayl who wrote the first Arabic novel "Hayy ibn Yaqzan". It may be the most important story you've never heard.

The Munk Debates on the decline and fall of the liberal international order

53:59 | May 9th, 2017

Is this the beginning of the end of the liberal international order? In a head-to-head Munk Debate, historian Niall Ferguson says Yes, the old order is collapsing, while commentator Fareed Zakaria argues No, there's life yet in liberal ideals.

Yesterday and Tomorrow: the rise of the extreme right in France, Part 3

53:58 | May 5th, 2017

The loudest people supporting Marine Le Pen are the young. Unemployed and disaffected, they're rejecting the elites that have failed them. What that means, and what it will mean to be French in the future, is what this election is about.

Liberty Leading the People: the rise of the extreme right in France, Part 2

53:58 | May 2nd, 2017

As the French pick a new president, it's the extreme right and the Front National with their candidate Marine Le Pen, which might well lead the French out of Europe and shut the door to immigrants. Philip Coulter reports.

The Enright Files: Fifty years after the Six-Day War

53:59 | May 1st, 2017

As the 50th anniversary of the Six-Day War approaches, The Enright Falls revisits interviews about that war and the way it and the fallout from Israel’s other conflicts still weigh on the state of Israel today.

Don't Shoot the Messenger: the value of whistleblowing

54:00 | Apr 28th, 2017

Recorded at Ryerson University's Centre for Free Expression, Paul Kennedy hosts a panel on why whistleblowers are vital to the public interest...and how their exposure of wrongdoing can ultimately be helpful, even to their workplace.

Chernobyl Remembered, Part 2

53:58 | Apr 27th, 2017

An encore presentation of Philip Coulter’s 2007 documentary, “The Zone of Absolute Exclusion” about the Chernobyl nuclear disaster that occurred on April 26, 1986. Thirty-one years later, it remains the worst nuclear accident in history.

Chernobyl Remembered, Part 1

53:58 | Apr 26th, 2017

An encore presentation of Philip Coulter’s 2007 documentary, “The Zone of Absolute Exclusion” about the Chernobyl nuclear disaster that occurred on April 26, 1986. Thirty-one years later, it remains the worst nuclear accident in history.

The Motorcycle is Yourself: revisiting 'Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance'

53:59 | Apr 25th, 2017

Robert Pirsig's Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance has been called the most widely read book of philosophy ever written. Forty years after its publication, Tim Wilson revisits an extraordinary interview he did with its author.

Children of the Fatherland: The Rise of the Extreme Right in France, Part 1

53:58 | Apr 21st, 2017

Philip Coulter explores the rise of the right-wing Front National party as France gets ready to elect their next president.

The Rise of the Anti-Establishment: Where do we go from here?

53:59 | Apr 20th, 2017

Robert Reich, former U.S. Secretary of Labor and Professor of Public Policy at University of California at Berkeley, details how understanding the circumstances that led to the election of Donald Trump can help shape a new democratic political sensib...Show More

Globalized Anger: The Enlightenment's Unwanted Child

54:00 | Apr 18th, 2017

Trumpism. Hindu nationalism. ISIS. People everywhere seem fed up with the status quo, and their anger and intolerance are finding political expression. Pankaj Mishra thinks the globalized anger is the legitimate offspring of the Enlightenment itself.

Globalized Anger: The Enlightenment's Unwanted Child

54:00 | Apr 18th, 2017

Trumpism. Hindu nationalism. ISIS. People everywhere seem fed up with the status quo, and their anger and intolerance are finding political expression. Pankaj Mishra thinks the globalized anger is the legitimate offspring of the Enlightenment itself.

Bread: salvation or damnation?

53:59 | Apr 14th, 2017

Bread is life. But for some, it represents a wrong turn in our species' evolution. Through conversation with bakers, religious leaders, historians and bread aficionados, producer Veronica Simmonds asks whether bread has led us to salvation or damnati...Show More

Bread: salvation or damnation?

53:59 | Apr 14th, 2017

Bread is life. But for some, it represents a wrong turn in our species' evolution. Through conversation with bakers, religious leaders, historians and bread aficionados, producer Veronica Simmonds asks whether bread has led us to salvation or damnati...Show More

Biocentrism: Rethinking Time, Space, Consciousness, and the Illusion of Death (Encore Oct 4, 2016)

54:00 | Apr 13th, 2017

Dr. Robert Lanza provides a compelling argument for consciousness as the basis for the universe, rather than consciousness simply being its by-product.

Biocentrism: Rethinking Time, Space, Consciousness, and the Illusion of Death (Encore Oct 4, 2016)

54:00 | Apr 13th, 2017

Dr. Robert Lanza provides a compelling argument for consciousness as the basis for the universe, rather than consciousness simply being its by-product.

Islamist Persistence: The Rise and Reality of Political Islam, Part 2

53:59 | Apr 12th, 2017

Was Islam founded on political principles? Is the rise of Islamism, after the Arab Spring, a natural evolution in Muslim-dominated countries? Author Shadi Hamid, an American Muslim and self-described liberal, says the rise of Islamist parties is inev...Show More

Islamist Persistence: The Rise and Reality of Political Islam, Part 2

53:59 | Apr 12th, 2017

Was Islam founded on political principles? Is the rise of Islamism, after the Arab Spring, a natural evolution in Muslim-dominated countries? Author Shadi Hamid, an American Muslim and self-described liberal, says the rise of Islamist parties is inev...Show More

Vimy at 100: Myth vs. Reality

54:00 | Apr 7th, 2017

It's been a century since Canada's bloody victory at Vimy Ridge during World War One. Historian Tim Cook, author of Vimy: The Battle and the Legend, peels back the layers of myth-making around Vimy to reveal its complex, at times contradictory, histo...Show More

Vimy at 100: Myth vs. Reality

54:00 | Apr 7th, 2017

It's been a century since Canada's bloody victory at Vimy Ridge during World War One. Historian Tim Cook, author of Vimy: The Battle and the Legend, peels back the layers of myth-making around Vimy to reveal its complex, at times contradictory, histo...Show More

Islamist Persistence: The Rise and Reality of Political Islam, Part 1

54:00 | Apr 5th, 2017

Was Islam founded on political principles? Is the rise of Islamism, after the Arab Spring, a natural evolution in Muslim-dominated countries? Author Shadi Hamid, a self-described liberal American-Muslim, says the rise of Islamist parties is inevitabl...Show More

Islamist Persistence: The Rise and Reality of Political Islam, Part 1

54:00 | Apr 5th, 2017

Was Islam founded on political principles? Is the rise of Islamism, after the Arab Spring, a natural evolution in Muslim-dominated countries? Author Shadi Hamid, a self-described liberal American-Muslim, says the rise of Islamist parties is inevitabl...Show More

Ireland 1916: how 800 years of British rule led to violent rebellion

54:00 | Apr 4th, 2017

On Easter Monday, April 24, 1916, the streets of Dublin were transformed into a war zone. This edition of The Enright Files revisits highlights of a two-hour special commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Easter Rising.

Ireland 1916: how 800 years of British rule led to violent rebellion

54:00 | Apr 4th, 2017

On Easter Monday, April 24, 1916, the streets of Dublin were transformed into a war zone. This edition of The Enright Files revisits highlights of a two-hour special commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Easter Rising.

The Return of History: Your Questions

53:58 | Apr 3rd, 2017

The CBC Massey Lectures inspire a lot of provocative questions. In this episode, the best of audience and listener questions put to Jennifer Welsh about her 2016 CBC Massey Lectures: The Return of History.

The Return of History: Your Questions

53:58 | Apr 3rd, 2017

The CBC Massey Lectures inspire a lot of provocative questions. In this episode, the best of audience and listener questions put to Jennifer Welsh about her 2016 CBC Massey Lectures: The Return of History.

Saving Syria: keeping war-torn culture alive

53:59 | Mar 24th, 2017

Destruction and displacement -- that's the story of Syria today. Paul Kennedy talks with three Syrians who believe in other Syrias, with stories about love, and laughter, and smell of jasmine and tarragon.

Saving Syria: keeping war-torn culture alive

53:59 | Mar 24th, 2017

Destruction and displacement -- that's the story of Syria today. Paul Kennedy talks with three Syrians who believe in other Syrias, with stories about love, and laughter, and smell of jasmine and tarragon.

Return of the Michif Boy: Confronting Métis trauma

53:35 | Mar 23rd, 2017

By reconnecting with his birth mother PhD student Jesse Thistle came to understand the effects of intergenerational trauma. His award-winning research shines a light on the struggles and the resilience of Métis communities in northern Saskatchewan.

Return of the Michif Boy: Confronting Métis trauma

53:35 | Mar 23rd, 2017

By reconnecting with his birth mother PhD student Jesse Thistle came to understand the effects of intergenerational trauma. His award-winning research shines a light on the struggles and the resilience of Métis communities in northern Saskatchewan.

A Peasant vs The Inquisition: Cheese, Worms and the Birth of Micro-history

54:00 | Mar 21st, 2017

Celebrated historian Carlo Ginzburg uncovers the past by telling the stories of the marginalized, the forgotten, and the suppressed.

A Peasant vs The Inquisition: Cheese, Worms and the Birth of Micro-history

54:00 | Mar 21st, 2017

Celebrated historian Carlo Ginzburg uncovers the past by telling the stories of the marginalized, the forgotten, and the suppressed.

Expletive Repeated: Why Swearing Matters

53:59 | Mar 16th, 2017

Profanity was once considered rude and crude -- a linguistic last resort. Not so these days. Younger generations use swearing as everyday slang, and academics study it as an ever-evolving form of creative and cultural expression.

Expletive Repeated: Why Swearing Matters

53:59 | Mar 16th, 2017

Profanity was once considered rude and crude -- a linguistic last resort. Not so these days. Younger generations use swearing as everyday slang, and academics study it as an ever-evolving form of creative and cultural expression.

The Immigrants: The rise of the extreme right in the Netherlands, Part 2

53:58 | Mar 14th, 2017

An immigrant story with a happy ending, but it's not a track most new immigrants might be able to follow -- the Dutch are struggling with a rise of right-wing, anti-immigrant sentiment on the eve of national elections.

The Immigrants: The rise of the extreme right in the Netherlands, Part 2

53:58 | Mar 14th, 2017

An immigrant story with a happy ending, but it's not a track most new immigrants might be able to follow -- the Dutch are struggling with a rise of right-wing, anti-immigrant sentiment on the eve of national elections.

The Night Watch: The Rise of the Extreme Right in The Netherlands, Part 1

53:58 | Mar 9th, 2017

Approaching this year's national elections, the Netherlands -- like many countries -- is experiencing an explosion of right-wing populism, fuelled by the anti-immigrant rhetoric of Geert Wilders. And the nation is torn.

The Night Watch: The Rise of the Extreme Right in The Netherlands, Part 1

53:58 | Mar 9th, 2017

Approaching this year's national elections, the Netherlands -- like many countries -- is experiencing an explosion of right-wing populism, fuelled by the anti-immigrant rhetoric of Geert Wilders. And the nation is torn.

The Lives of Women, Readers and Alice Munro

53:59 | Mar 8th, 2017

On a cold, autumn night a group of women gather for their regular book club. Over snacks, wine and tea, they discuss Alice Munro's work, and how her stories illuminate some of the deepest issues in their own lives.

The Lives of Women, Readers and Alice Munro

53:59 | Mar 8th, 2017

On a cold, autumn night a group of women gather for their regular book club. Over snacks, wine and tea, they discuss Alice Munro's work, and how her stories illuminate some of the deepest issues in their own lives.

How Existentialist and Conservative Philosophers Think About Freedom

54:00 | Mar 6th, 2017

On this month's edition of The Enright Files, conversations about, and with, existentialist and conservative philosophers.

How Existentialist and Conservative Philosophers Think About Freedom

54:00 | Mar 6th, 2017

On this month's edition of The Enright Files, conversations about, and with, existentialist and conservative philosophers.

Beyond the Huddled Masses

53:58 | Mar 2nd, 2017

Where we come from, and how we got here from there, shapes who we are. From the 2016 Stratford Festival, three fighters for human rights share their experiences.

Beyond the Huddled Masses

53:58 | Mar 2nd, 2017

Where we come from, and how we got here from there, shapes who we are. From the 2016 Stratford Festival, three fighters for human rights share their experiences.

Ideas from the Trenches - Refuge

54:00 | Feb 27th, 2017

PhD students Kiran Banerjee and Craig Damian Smith propose a radical re-thinking of the institutions that shape how nations respond to the voices of refugees.

Ideas from the Trenches - Refuge

54:00 | Feb 27th, 2017

PhD students Kiran Banerjee and Craig Damian Smith propose a radical re-thinking of the institutions that shape how nations respond to the voices of refugees.

Downloading Decision: Could machines make better decisions for us?

54:00 | Feb 23rd, 2017

Humans like to let others make decisions for them. But what happens when those decisions are made by machines or artificial intelligence? Can we trust them to make the right choices?

Downloading Decision: Could machines make better decisions for us?

54:00 | Feb 23rd, 2017

Humans like to let others make decisions for them. But what happens when those decisions are made by machines or artificial intelligence? Can we trust them to make the right choices?

The Proper Role of Science: Peter Gluckman

54:00 | Feb 22nd, 2017

The Harper government muzzled scientists. Donald Trump's administration is now doing the same. But a better relationship between science and government is possible. Highlights from a talk by Sir Peter Gluckman.

The Proper Role of Science: Peter Gluckman

54:00 | Feb 22nd, 2017

The Harper government muzzled scientists. Donald Trump's administration is now doing the same. But a better relationship between science and government is possible. Highlights from a talk by Sir Peter Gluckman.

From Tolerance to Tyranny

53:59 | Feb 21st, 2017

Christians, Muslims and Jews lived together in relative harmony in medieval Spain. Then the Spanish Inquisition came along with its use of terror and racism, turning a pluralistic society into a police state

From Tolerance to Tyranny

53:59 | Feb 21st, 2017

Christians, Muslims and Jews lived together in relative harmony in medieval Spain. Then the Spanish Inquisition came along with its use of terror and racism, turning a pluralistic society into a police state

Wachtel On The Arts - Phyllis Lambert

52:59 | Feb 21st, 2017

Eleanor Wachtel speaks to Canadian architectural activist, Phyllis Lambert, in celebration of her exceptional career on her 90th birthday.

Wachtel On The Arts - Phyllis Lambert

52:59 | Feb 21st, 2017

Eleanor Wachtel speaks to Canadian architectural activist, Phyllis Lambert, in celebration of her exceptional career on her 90th birthday.

The Rabbit and the Giraffe, Part 1 (Encore September 12, 2016)

53:59 | Feb 21st, 2017

Jean Vanier, who founded the L'Arche movement in 1963 for people with profound disabilities, quickly learned that "normal" people have much to learn about being human by watching those we perceive as weak. Jean Vanier in conversation with Philip Cou...Show More

The Rabbit and the Giraffe, Part 1 (Encore September 12, 2016)

53:59 | Feb 21st, 2017

Jean Vanier, who founded the L'Arche movement in 1963 for people with profound disabilities, quickly learned that "normal" people have much to learn about being human by watching those we perceive as weak. Jean Vanier in conversation with Philip Cou...Show More

The Marriage of True Minds, Part 2

54:00 | Feb 15th, 2017

Can marriage be a source of inspiration, creativity, mutual influence, and intellectual support? A look at the relationships of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir; and Georgia O'Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz.

The Marriage of True Minds, Part 2

54:00 | Feb 15th, 2017

Can marriage be a source of inspiration, creativity, mutual influence, and intellectual support? A look at the relationships of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir; and Georgia O'Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz.

The Marriage of True Minds, Part 1

54:00 | Feb 14th, 2017

Can marriage be a source of inspiration, creativity, mutual influence, and intellectual support? A look at the relationships of Abelard and Heloise; Percy Bysse Shelley and Mary Wollestonecraft Shelley; and Georges Sand and Frederic Chopin.

The Marriage of True Minds, Part 1

54:00 | Feb 14th, 2017

Can marriage be a source of inspiration, creativity, mutual influence, and intellectual support? A look at the relationships of Abelard and Heloise; Percy Bysse Shelley and Mary Wollestonecraft Shelley; and Georges Sand and Frederic Chopin.

Surviving Post-Capitalism: Coping, hoping, doping & shopping

54:00 | Feb 9th, 2017

In conversation with Paul Kennedy about his book How Will Capitalism End?, Wolfgang Streeck makes the unnerving case that capitalism is now at a point where it cannot survive itself.

The Challenge of Peace

53:58 | Feb 8th, 2017

We have the best communications in history, except for the kind that matters -- nations and states understanding each other. Jennifer Welsh, Paul Heinbecker, Peter Boehm and Arne Kislenko in conversation from the Stratford Festival.

The Enright Files on humanizing Canada's penal system

53:59 | Feb 6th, 2017

a hard look at Canada's penal system, exploring ideas about how prisons can keep society safe in the long run. Michael Enright speaks with some remarkable people who serve prisoners, and society, in special ways.

Ecology of Sound: Hildegard Westerkamp

53:59 | Feb 2nd, 2017

Paul Kennedy joins sound ecologist Hildegard Westerkamp on a sound-walk through Vancouver's downtown eastside, and explores how opening our ears to our surroundings can open our minds.

After Guantanamo

53:58 | Feb 1st, 2017

From the Stratford Festival, Dennis Edney, Omar Khadr’s lawyer, talks with Paul Kennedy about a life-changing experience that contains a challenge for us all.

Media in the Age of Terrorism: Mohamed Fahmy

54:00 | Jan 31st, 2017

For 438 days, journalist Mohamed Fahmy was locked away in an Egyptian jail, including solitary confinement in the brutal Scorpion wing of Cairo's Tora Prison. He reflects on the experience in the 2016 Dalton Camp Lecture.

The importance of being ethical with Dr. Janet Rossant

54:00 | Jan 30th, 2017

Winner of the 2016 Friesen International Prize for Health Science Research, Dr. Janet Rossant argues that recent revolutions in genetic medicine demand comparable advances in our understanding of the underlying morality and ethics.

Darkwave - Underwater languages at the brink of extinction (Encore Sept 28, 2016)

53:57 | Jan 26th, 2017

Whales are threatened by us. Their language eroding through noise and climate change. Carrie Haber explores how marine scientists around the world are thinking about our evolutionary courtship with these magnificent mammals in the sea.

The Causes and Consequences of Brexit: Timothy Garton Ash

54:00 | Jan 26th, 2017

Some have called it the unravelling of Europe, while others claim it may signal the end of liberalism. Brexit both surprised and confounded experts who never thought it would happen. Timothy Garton delivers the Donner Canadian Foundation Lecture.

Reconciliation Before Reconciliation with Dr. Tracey Lindberg

53:59 | Jan 23rd, 2017

Dr. Tracey Lindberg explores the importance of reconciliation with self, with community, and with Indigenous peoples in advance of reconciliation with Canada.

The Truth about "Post-Truth"

54:00 | Jan 19th, 2017

The election of Donald Trump has ignited talk that we're now living in a "post-truth" era. But are we? And if we are, what are the origins of this idea that the truth no longer exists, or if it does, that it doesn't matter anymore?

American Fascism: It Can't Happen Here? (Encore October 28, 2016)

54:00 | Jan 18th, 2017

What did the Trump campaign, and the voters it mobilized, have in common with Fascism, not only in Europe but in America's own dark past?

Wachtel On The Arts - John Neumeier

53:02 | Jan 17th, 2017

Choreographer John Neumeier has been at the cutting edge of dance for more than fifty years. He talks to Eleanor Wachtel about how he went from being a tap-dancing kid in Milwaukee to the celebrated Artistic Director of the Hamburg Ballet.

Screened Off: The dangers of an insular web

54:00 | Jan 16th, 2017

Corporate control, and the "tyranny of the popular." Fake news, filter bubbles, and apps as "walled gardens." Have we lost a free and democratic internet? And did we do this to ourselves? Featuring Sue Gardner, Hossein Derakhan, and Brodie Fenlon

Fat & Sugar, Part 1 (Encore June 15, 2016)

54:00 | Jan 9th, 2017

Jill Eisen explores the complex, and sometimes contradictory, science of nutrition - and tries to find clarity amidst the thicket of studies and ambiguous research.

God Wants You To Be Rich (Encore Oct 7, 2016)

54:00 | Jan 9th, 2017

Why do millions of Christians in the United States believe that their faith, financial status and health are all intertwined? That's the question that Paul Kennedy explores with Kate Bowler, author of Blessed: A History of the American Prosperity Gos...Show More

Commute From Hell

54:00 | Jan 9th, 2017

Work can’t help but be affected when people spend almost as much time commuting as they spend on the job. How can a stressful commute impact a person's professional performance? What does it ultimately do to family life, or social engagements?

Fat & Sugar, Part 2 (Encore June 22, 2016)

54:00 | Jan 9th, 2017

Jill Eisen explores the complex, and sometimes contradictory, science of nutrition - and tries to find clarity amidst the thicket of studies and ambiguous research.

The Enright Files - Ideas to make a better world

53:59 | Jan 2nd, 2017

This month on The Enright Files, ideas to improve our communities, our countries and our quality of life. Interviews with Rutger Bregman, Janette Sadik-Khan, Pasi Sahlberg & Karyn McCluskey.

The 2016 Sobey Art Award: The New Masters, Part 2

54:00 | Dec 22nd, 2016

Conversations with 2016 Sobey Art Award winner Jeremy Shaw and finalist Charles Stankievech.

The 2016 Sobey Art Award: The New Masters, Part 1

54:00 | Dec 21st, 2016

Conversations with three of the 2016 Sobey Art Award finalists - Brenda Draney, William Robinson and Hajra Waheed

Reflections on Global Affairs: Is the world really falling apart?

53:59 | Dec 19th, 2016

IDEAS in partnership with the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto reflects upon the state of the world. Featuring: Michael Blake, Randall Hansen, Janice Stein, and Stephen Toope.

Seed Banks: Re-sowing paradise

53:59 | Dec 16th, 2016

In the face of climate change and declining biodiversity, one of humanity's oldest cultural practices – seed saving – has a new urgency. Maria Zytaruk explores how preserving seeds reflects the deepest of human fears and hopes.

The Orwell Tapes, Part 2 (Encore April 11, 2016)

54:00 | Dec 15th, 2016

He was one of the most influential writers of our time. His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us 'big brother', 'thoughtcrime', 'doublethink', whose name looms so large in this era of mass surveillance?

The Orwell Tapes, Part 3 (Encore April 18, 2016)

54:00 | Dec 15th, 2016

He was one of the most influential writers of our time. His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us 'big brother', 'thoughtcrime', 'doublethink', whose name looms so large in this era of mass surveillance?

The Sea Women (Encore Oct 18, 2007)

54:00 | Dec 14th, 2016

South Korea's "sea women" have been harvesting treasures from the ocean floor since the 4th century. With only a few tools and fishing baskets slung over their shoulders, these sunburnt and wrinkled grandmothers can dive up to 20 metres on a single b...Show More

Writing in Worried Times

53:59 | Dec 13th, 2016

They may be successful writers, but that doesn't mean the 2016 Governor General's Literary Award winners are immune from worry about the world around us. Authors share some brand new work on that theme.

Cracking the Moral Code

54:00 | Dec 12th, 2016

We all have a moral code -- a clear sense of what is right and what is wrong. But the reasons why we make certain decisions can quickly get fuzzy. Producer John Chipman explores why some people stick to their moral codes more stringently than others,...Show More

Decoding Death: The Science and Significance of Near Death Experiences

54:00 | Dec 7th, 2016

The nature of "near death experiences", or NDE's has historically been the territory of religion and philosophy. But now science has staked its claim in the discussion. Ashley Walters explores the science and the meaning of near death experiences.

The Enright Files on William Shakespeare and James Joyce

53:59 | Dec 5th, 2016

On this edition of The Enright Files, we mark the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare and the 100th anniversary of James Joyce's great novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.

The Orwell Tapes, Part 1 (Encore April 4, 2016)

53:59 | Dec 2nd, 2016

He was one of the most influential writers of our time. His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us 'big brother', 'thoughtcrime', 'doublethink', whose name looms so large in this era of mass surveillance?

Rear View Mirror: Has the future ever looked like the past?

53:58 | Dec 2nd, 2016

It's tempting to think that in order to comprehend the future, we need to know the past, that there are always lessons in history. But is that true anymore? Sailing in the 21st century, perhaps we are in uncharted waters.

Ideas From The Trenches - The Dangerous Game

54:00 | Nov 30th, 2016

As a teen and then in her 20s, Emma Vosen loved gaming. Now as a PhD candidate, she looks to gamer culture as a microcosm of how sexism is seeded and replicated within broader society.

It's the Economists, Stupid (Encore Sept 9, 2015)

53:59 | Nov 28th, 2016

Interest rates. Unemployment. GDP. Markets. Austerity measures. Economists tell us what we, as societies, can and can't afford. But how do they decide? What values are at play?

Wachtel On The Arts - Ai Weiwei

51:47 | Nov 28th, 2016

Chinese artist Ai Weiwei in conversation with Eleanor Wachtel about his beautiful and subversive art and about his fight for freedom and democracy in China.

The Matter of Meat: A history of pros and cons

54:00 | Nov 25th, 2016

Eating meat: some say we've evolved to do it. It's in our DNA. It's how we got our big brains. Now -- perhaps more than ever -- when it comes to the matter of meat, clear-cut answers can be hard to come by. Kevin Ball serves up the arguments.

Is That All There Is? The Challenge of Science

53:58 | Nov 25th, 2016

Science helps us understand ourselves and our own place in the cosmos. But how far does the math take us, and what do science and the humanities tell us when we look at the same questions from different points of view?

Wit's End, Part 1 (Encore June 20)

54:00 | Nov 22nd, 2016

What's it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit's end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there's stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.

The Tedium is the Message

54:00 | Nov 22nd, 2016

Contributor Peter Mitton examines boredom and discovers a little-understood universal state of mind. From its obvious downsides and unexpected upsides, to its evolutionary origins and the way it's shaping our future -- boredom is anything but dull.

Wit's End, Part 2 (June 27, 2016)

54:00 | Nov 22nd, 2016

What's it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit's end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there's stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.