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News & Politics

Seriously...

BBC Radio 4

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A rich selection of documentaries aimed at relentlessly curious minds, introduced by Rhianna Dhillon.
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39:10 | Jan 16th, 2018

Before 9/11 British attitudes to partaking in faith-inspired armed combat were... different. British Muslims travelled freely to fight in Afghanistan, Bosnia, Burma and Kashmir for a few weeks or months, and then returned home to their day jobs or...Show More

58:40 | Jan 12th, 2018

Rhianna Dhillon brings you another seriously interesting story from Radio 4. This week, luck. Whether we believe in luck or not, we do use the word- a lot! More as a figure of speech than an article of faith perhaps but some do pray for luck, ...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

30:16 | Aug 11th, 2017

In the slums of Wakaliga, Uganda, a group of self-taught filmmakers run one of the world's most unlikely movie studios. Known as Wakaliwood they have released fifty-two feature films in ten years, with kit built from scrap metal and old car jacks. ...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

59:55 | Aug 8th, 2017

On the 50th Anniversary of the ground breaking 1967 Sexual Offences Act, the campaigner Peter Tatchell takes a sceptical look at its impact on Britain's gay communities. Although it was a major staging post in the long and tortuous fight for the d...Show More

30:26 | Feb 9th, 2016

The writing of Carson McCullers has perhaps never been as popular or acclaimed as that of contemporaries such as Harper Lee and Tennessee Williams, but nonetheless she remains one of the most remarkable and individual writers to come out of twentieth...Show More

28:27 | Sep 13th

"I always say, it's my house - I'll do what I want. People choose to come into the house, that's fine by me, of course you're extremely welcome to come through the door, but when you come into my world it's my rules." Step inside the House of Dreams...Show More

28:38 | Sep 10th

Ben Ferguson explores corporate sponsorship in the arts and the murkier area of brand-artist collaboration. The art world is saturated with corporate money. There are big sponsorship deals, where companies underwrite cultural institutions like the N...Show More

28:32 | Sep 6th

We hear from one of the world’s last remaining globemakers and reflect on the globe’s cultural and symbolic currency. While Google Earth may give us intricate detail of every inch of land, there’s nothing like clutching a globe to properly comprehen...Show More

28:21 | Sep 3rd

According to the most recent Home Office statistics, the largest national grouping held in slavery here in the UK is British. Sangita Myska uncovers the hidden story of these victims, revealing who they are and how their enslavement can happen within...Show More

37:27 | Aug 30th

Dr Nina Burrowes asks whether we should scrap the use of juries in rape trials - and if the current system for trying serious sexual assaults needs reform. Figures from 2017 and 2018 show the number of rape cases being charged by prosecutors in Engl...Show More

28:21 | Aug 27th

Why do you keep going back to the fridge after dinner? Fruit and vegetables, a balanced diet, low salt, low sugar and moderate exercise seem to be the silver bullets loaded into a revolver that has only ever fired blanks at the problem of Britain’s o...Show More

28:43 | Aug 23rd

In an age of certainty, of assertions without facts, and sometimes assertions with facts, Mark O’Connell makes the case for a different virtue – ambivalence. Six years on from his thought-provoking, witty and charming Four Thought, he returns to make...Show More

28:59 | Aug 20th

Comedy and alcohol have often been linked down the years, but why do the two go hand-in-glove? The days of the seven-round lunch are - for most - no longer part of the cut-and-thrust of comedy writing and performing, but booze and laughter are still ...Show More

57:44 | Aug 16th

The untold story of the years when Black Power came to Britain and forever left its mark - the coming together, political ideas, leaders and legacy. Inspired by the American Black Panther Party, the British Black Panthers were founded in London’s No...Show More

37:47 | Aug 13th

David Baker, contributing editor of Wired, explores the challenges Facebook must meet and overcome in order to survive after a disastrous period which has seen the reputation and the business model of the social media giant questioned like never befo...Show More

28:54 | Aug 9th

Lucy Cooke sets out to discover why honesty is almost certainly not the best policy, be you chicken, chimp or human being. It turns out that underhand behaviour is rife throughout the animal kingdom, and can be a winning evolutionary strategy. From s...Show More

28:59 | Aug 6th

Hannah Jane Walker argues that sensitivity is overlooked, dismissed and under-utilised, and argues that our society would be much better off if we embraced it instead. Two years ago, Hannah gave a Four Thought talk about sensitivity, and received hu...Show More

28:53 | Aug 2nd

Journalist Hugh Muir travels with Sir Simon Woolley, head of Operation Black Vote, to Buckingham Palace, where he is to receive his knighthood from HM The Queen. It’s a journey that lays bare the dilemma, the joy, the soul-searching and the agony of ...Show More

57:56 | Jul 30th

Anxiety has become one of the defining characteristics of our modern age, with millions of us suffering from its various damaging effects. It comes in many shapes and sizes - status anxiety, social anxiety, and more recently Brexit and Eco-anxiety. F...Show More

37:41 | Jul 26th

What happens when top graduates work behind bars as prison officers? Lucy Ash meets young people who have forsaken lucrative careers in the City or elsewhere, for what many see as one of the world’s worst jobs. They’re part of Graduates Unlocked, a s...Show More

28:39 | Jul 23rd

Inspired by her long-distance friendship with Nasro, a young refugee living in a Kenyan camp, Warsan Shire has written and reads five poems about her and the experience of exile. The much admired Somali/British poet has become the laureate of displac...Show More

28:12 | Jul 19th

Fifty years after Apollo astronauts first walked on the lunar surface, the world is heading back to make the Moon a new home. “We left flags and footprints,” said the head of NASA Jim Bridenstine recently. “This time when we go, we’re going to go to...Show More

05:26 | Jul 17th

Claire Read introduces her special podcast series about the impact of one day of the British army’s war in Afghanistan on the troops who were there and the families they left behind. Download the Deadliest Day series from the Beyond Today podcast.

28:51 | Jul 16th

Guilty pleasures, cheeky treats – comedian Sofie Hagen asks why we put moral judgements onto the food we eat. Clean eating is the diet of the moment. All over Instagram, people post photos of their beautiful plates of leafy vegetables and their arti...Show More

28:44 | Jul 12th

An audio elegy and a lament for the disappearing sea ice of the North Pole. The sound of ice melting, thawing and shifting across a year is the essence of this tone poem, woven with song, poetry, art and music about the ice. This first of three prog...Show More

28:49 | Jul 9th

A celebration of the simple joys of life, and the story of Brecht’s much-loved poem that described them. In 1954, poet and playwright Bertolt Brecht was the leader of his own theatre company and an international literary star. But his relationship w...Show More

29:03 | Jul 5th

How did Shakespeare's single starling take down a passenger plane and wreak environmental havoc across America? There are hundreds of references to birds in Shakespeare's work, some many times over. But the starling is only mentioned once - in Henry...Show More

57:47 | Jul 2nd

Will Self goes in search of a dying species - the eccentric. The relationship between true eccentricity and mainstream society is complex, dynamic and now in serious trouble. Will, who has always been obsessed with the strange and the bizarre, sets ...Show More

28:31 | Jun 28th

A tense debate is taking place in states across America. At what age should someone be allowed to marry? Currently in 48 out of 50 states a child can marry, usually with parental consent or a judge's discretion. In 17 states there's no minimum age me...Show More

57:54 | Jun 25th

Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen explores the social history of DIY home improvements, from Chintz to Changing Rooms and beyond. The Age of Emulsion is a story about our changing attitudes to housing, consumerism, national identity, sense of individuality, c...Show More

28:33 | Jun 21st

Writer Isobel Finkel takes us to Istanbul, where art and censorship are never too far apart. The state’s attempts to protect citizens from illicit sounds have taken absurd forms over the years, from the banning of all Turkish-language music from the ...Show More

28:22 | Jun 18th

Can the arts help solve today’s burning issues? Perhaps not entirely, but there’s no harm in trying. As the UK’s “anxiety economy” continues to grow and we spend more money on supposed stress-relieving services and products – from meditation apps an...Show More

29:11 | Jun 14th

Music journalist John Doran travels across the country in search of an underground movement of musicians, blossoming in the margins of Britain. Artists of all stripes have been driven out of the city centres by soaring rent prices and hit hard by th...Show More

15:22 | Jun 11th

Hate seems to be everywhere - whether it’s white supremacists marching on the streets of America, jihadists slaughtering Christians in Sri Lanka or the massacre of Muslims in New Zealand. In this five part series, BBC journalist Allan Little unpicks ...Show More

28:21 | Jun 7th

While the video games industry is big business, it's also breaking new ground in the arts. We're at a cultural tipping point for the industry. For the past decade the process of producing and distributing games has become easier so there's now a wid...Show More

28:26 | Jun 4th

"You don't start a dance by letting breath out, you do it by taking breath in... it's coming to life." Eileen Kramer first fell in love with a dance in 1939 - watching the members of Gertrud Bodenwieser's company waltz to the Blue Danube in Sydney i...Show More

29:03 | May 31st

Comedian and music obsessive Gabriel Ebulue investigates a deadly karaoke curse in the Philippines concerning Frank Sinatra’s classic My Way. In recent years, performances of the song in karaoke bars and videoke joints have reportedly caused outbrea...Show More

28:41 | May 28th

A third of the world’s food depends on pollinators like bees. Plants that produce almonds, apples, plums, peaches and coffee all need bees but honey bees are in decline – endangered by a complex mix of disease, pesticides, habitat loss and a changing...Show More

28:33 | May 24th

Journalist Kieran Yates grew up in a South Asian family on a council estate in London. Living side by side with her neighbours, and separated only by thin walls, she heard a diverse array of sounds from immigrant communities – from jungle and R&B to ...Show More

28:45 | May 21st

Neuroscientist Hannah Critchlow asks what the latest brain research might be telling us about ideas of free will, nature and nurture, and destiny. At the dawn of neuroscience, it was an established principle that all of the neurons in the brain are...Show More

28:35 | May 20th

Radio 1 Breakfast Show host Greg James digs into the BBC's archives, taking some of the week's news stories as a starting point for a trip into the past. Greg, who describes himself as a "proud radio nerd", is let loose in the vast BBC vaults, home ...Show More

28:20 | May 17th

We assume the instruments we know and love today will be around forever. What if they're not? What new forms and ideas could take their place? Hannah Catherine Jones takes you into the world of the prototype, meeting instrument inventors challenging ...Show More

27:12 | May 14th

Ex-inmate Carl Cattermole explores the power of concerts that have taken place in jails. Music lover Carl recently served an 18-month prison sentence. While inside, he found solace by listening to music through his headphones - but never had the ex...Show More

28:32 | May 10th

Arthur is eleven, likes dinosaurs and plays the cello. Arthur's dad Babak is 40, an artist and a former musician. His most successful artistic endeavour was when he collected twigs and sold them on eBay for £62. As his self-deprecating social media ...Show More

28:58 | May 7th

Singer and song collector Sam Lee travels to the remote mountains of Greece and discovers the haunting sound of Europe's oldest folk music. High in the black mountains of Epirus, close to the northwestern tip of Greece, winding its way through the t...Show More

28:32 | May 3rd

Deputy Editor of Elle Magazine UK, Kenya Hunt, celebrates the work of black designers in fashion and investigates how the fashion world is grappling with conversations around race. Kenya meets different generations of black designers, exploring thei...Show More

29:01 | Apr 30th

Tom Heap sets off on a guilt trip road trip to find out why people like him won't give up the things they know are destroying the planet. Tom loves his powerful car. Despite a pretty thorough knowledge of the science of climate change and the contri...Show More

28:27 | Apr 26th

Social media, especially Twitter has changed the way we consume the news. Articles, commentaries and opinions are put into our news feeds by the people we choose to follow. We tend to only follow the people we agree with and like, and block and unfol...Show More

28:41 | Apr 23rd

Mona Chalabi asks why female facial hair still seems to be a source of such shame. Last year, when she sent a lighthearted tweet about hairy women, she was deluged with replies. Hundreds of women wrote to her to describe the physical and emotional p...Show More

28:45 | Apr 19th

Clara Amfo assesses the rise of voguing in the UK, a dance form with its origins among queer, mostly black and Latino people in the Harlem ballroom scene. Voguing is currently having a resurgence in popularity thanks to shows like Pose, Top 40 artist...Show More

05:16 | Apr 17th

Hannah Fry and Adam Rutherford present highlights from their podcast in which they investigate everyday mysteries using the power of science.

28:34 | Apr 16th

In the world of classical ballet, black dancers are conspicuous by their absence. Eric Underwood, a former soloist with The Royal Ballet, wants to understand what might be restricting their participation. In Amsterdam, Eric meets Michaela DePrince,...Show More

29:05 | Apr 12th

Animal senses reveal a wealth of information that humans can't access. Birds can see in ultra violet, and some fish can 'feel' electricity. But how do different species sense time? If you've ever tried to swat flies, you'll know that they seem to ha...Show More

28:40 | Apr 9th

Life for the child of an alcoholic can be lonely, locked inside a house of secrets. A code of silence means they don't want to talk to friends, or neighbours, or even their brothers and sisters. Journalist Camilla Tominey, whose mother was an alcoh...Show More

28:58 | Apr 5th

Journalist and Grime fan Yomi Adegoke noticed something lacking when it comes to discovering and enjoying the genre of music she loves. Women who look like her. Whether it’s behind the scenes or at the forefront, black women seem noticeably absent w...Show More

29:31 | Apr 2nd

Women once made up 80% of the computer industry. They are now less than 20%. Mary Ann Sieghart explores the hidden and disturbing consequences of not having women at the heart of the tech. Who is the in room today when technology is designed determi...Show More

18:28 | Mar 25th

Effigies, aliases, and a 'golden cage': it all comes down to this in the series finale about Vladislav Surkov, the most powerful man you’ve never heard of. Presented by Gabriel Gatehouse.

18:15 | Mar 25th

Is it all getting too much for the hero – or is he the villain of our series? His name is Vladislav Surkov and his enemies are circling. Gabriel Gatehouse continues the story of the most powerful man you've never heard of.

18:20 | Mar 25th

The story of Vladislav Surkov, the most powerful man you’ve never heard of, continues. His background is in theatre and PR, but his profession is politics. And in this episode, Gabriel Gatehouse tells the story of how it all comes together in a bold ...Show More

18:32 | Mar 25th

This is the story of the most powerful man you’ve never heard of. He can spot an ex-spy with presidential potential and help turn him into a world leader. He creates opposition movements out of thin air. He’s got a nation’s news directors on speed ...Show More

18:26 | Mar 25th

The Puppet Master is a series that gets to the bewildering heart of contemporary Russia by exploring the fortunes of a secretive, complicated and controversial man called Vladislav Surkov. Reporter Gabriel Gatehouse speaks fluent Russian and has ac...Show More

57:26 | Mar 22nd

On the 14th floor of Grenfell Tower, firefighters moved eight residents into flat 113. Only four would survive. Using evidence from stage 1 of the Grenfell Tower Public Inquiry, Katie Razzall pieces together what went wrong that night in flat 113. Th...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

28:45 | Mar 19th

Folk singer Sam Lee, along with William Parsons of the British Pilgrimage Trust, lead eleven pilgrims on a journey across Sussex tracing the origins of the iconic folk song The Turtle Dove. Over a hundred years ago, the composer Ralph Vaughan Willia...Show More

28:42 | Mar 15th

In April 1993, a black teenager, Stephen Lawrence was murdered in a racist attack in the London suburb of Eltham. The Metropolitan Police bungled the investigation into his killers. The Inquiry which followed by Sir William Macpherson produced one of...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

28:58 | Mar 12th

Journalist Afua Hirsch used to be a barrister, but after only two years advocating for some of the most vulnerable people in society she quit. For Afua, cuts to legal aid and burgeoning caseloads were making it impossible to do the job to the standar...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

28:25 | Mar 8th

What’s it like to be deported or forcibly removed from the UK? Recorded over the past year, these are the stories of three people sent to Nigeria, a country they left many years ago, and what happens to them once they arrive. Fola was training to be ...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:04 | Mar 5th

Clara Amfo travels to New Orleans to meet the staff and artists from The Embassy, a dynamic, groundbreaking music studio in the 8th and 9th Districts. Based in one of the city’s most deprived areas, the studio works with music artists of all kinds to...Show More

28:36 | Mar 4th

What do you do when you realise you’re non-binary? How do you come out to yourself? How do you find people like you? Caitlin Benedict is coming out. But before they begin, they need to really understand what it’s like to live as non-binary: to exist ...Show More

29:28 | Mar 1st

With “toxic masculinity” high on the agenda, are we are now viewing boys as potential perpetrators of sexism and violence? Is this fair - and what should we be teaching them? After #MeToo with phrases like “toxic masculinity” on everyone's lips, are ...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:12 | Feb 26th

Social psychologist Dr Keon West explores racial bias, and the concepts of both conscious and unconscious bias, drawing on the latest pyschological and sociological research. He examines common misconceptions surrounding racism and examines how bias ...Show More

28:50 | Feb 22nd

Who owns Shakespeare? The English? The tourist industry? The world? Branding and Graphic Designer Teresa Monachino goes in search of the 21st century phenomenon that is William Shakespeare and uncovers his contradictory brand values, with the help of...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:37 | Feb 19th

Imagine a therapy that made use of the body's own biology to specifically and selectively attack illness, with no side effects and at minimal cost - one that could treat pain and relieve subjective symptoms. It would be one of the most powerful tools...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:11 | Feb 15th

Are we really more distracted than ever before? Historian Rhys Jones explores the history of distraction and how previous generations have fought back We are often told we are in the middle of a distraction crisis - big tech companies have learned ho...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:12 | Feb 12th

John Wilson follows PJ Harvey as she creates the score for a new West End theatre production of All About Eve. Singer songwriter Polly Jean Harvey is the only artist to have twice won the Mercury Prize for Album of the Year – for Stories from the Ci...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:42 | Feb 8th

Jazz writer Kevin Legendre explores the encounter between American modern jazz and the French New wave in Paris in the late 1950s and 60s. Paris in the civil rights era was a hub of artistic collaboration as well as a kind of political refuge - a de...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

58:20 | Feb 5th

America today is an uncivil society with a President who calls for his opponent to be locked up, a legislature that seems to be interested only in partisan shouting, not governing, and with large chunks of the media egging on the bad behaviour. This ...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

28:33 | Feb 1st

Britt Wray investigates the drugs used to delay puberty in children questioning their gender. A growing number of children in Britain are being seen by the NHS Gender Identity Development Service. Referrals have increased from just over 200 in 2011/1...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

57:52 | Jan 29th

Designer Wayne Hemingway examines 100 years of British advertising on film and television, with special behind-the-scenes access to the one of the world’s largest advertising collection at the British Film Institute. Wayne follows advertisers’ first ...Show More

27:15 | Jan 28th

Bill sets off on a mission to shake up the music industry by causing chaos and confusion.

28:13 | Jan 25th

Beanbags! Beanbags are what Millenials want from a job - along with free food and the lofty idea of ‘making an impact’. That’s what academic Simon Sinek's video about "Millennials in the Workplace", enjoyed by over 10 millions viewers, would have you...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

28:10 | Jan 22nd

Writer Charles Sprawson reflects on his life as he copes with advancing dementia. Charles Sprawson is the author of Haunts of the Black Masseur: The Swimmer As Hero - a romantic history of swimming and a memoir of his own adventures in water. Now 77,...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

28:27 | Jan 18th

What are we all so awkward about? Annalisa Dinnella explores this slippery emotion. Can she and a group of comedians outsmart awkwardness - and should they even be trying? Annalisa has 5% vision and regularly navigates the fog of other people’s awkwa...Show More

28:22 | Jan 15th

At a time when we're being told we need more empathy, some experts claim that narcissism - empathy's evil twin - is on the rise. Narcissism has vaulted off the psychotherapist’s couch, sprinted away from the psychiatric ward, and is now squatting in ...Show More

28:19 | Jan 15th

Empathy is the psycho-political buzzword of the day. President Obama said - frequently - that America's empathy deficit was more important than the Federal deficit. Bill Clinton said "I feel your pain", and Hillary urged us all "to see the world thro...Show More

28:56 | Jan 11th

As she prepares to perform two roles in a new production of the classic "White ballet", La Bayadere, the Royal Ballet's charismatic Argentinian-born principal dancer, Marianela Nunez shares her life behind the scenes. Marianela Nunez is considered on...Show More

23:31 | Jan 9th

From H.P. Lovecraft: The investigation into a mysterious disappearance.

28:32 | Jan 8th

In 1969 Harold Wilson's Government lowered the voting age from 21 to 18. Fifty years on, with calls for votes at 16 gaining support, Professor James Tilley explores not just whether reducing it further makes sense, but if arguments could be made for ...Show More

58:20 | Jan 4th

Six months before Neil Armstrong’s ‘one small step’ came humanity’s giant leap. It was December 1968. Faced with President Kennedy’s challenge to land a man on the Moon before the end of the decade, NASA made the bold decision to send three astronaut...Show More

58:29 | Jan 1st

Two families from very different backgrounds, one street and a baby on a doorstep. This series charts the story of how a young Christian couple came to entrust the care of their little daughter to a Muslim family that lived nearby in 1990s Watford. T...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

28:58 | Dec 28th, 2018

Ever since an Artificial Intelligence called Deep Blue beat human chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov in 1997, it has been clear that the days of humans’ supremacy at the games table have been numbered. But twenty years later, it still came as a surpris...Show More

37:51 | Dec 25th, 2018

How did Twitter, invented to allow friends to keep track of each other's social lives and interests, become a key forum for political debate? And what effect has the social media platform had on the nature and quality of public life? Presenter David ...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:16 | Dec 21st, 2018

In February 2016 a controversial wall in Belfast was demolished. It was the first of over a hundred such structures across Northern Ireland set to disappear by 2023. Collectively, they’re known as peacelines. Some are just a few hundred yards long, o...Show More

02:27 | Dec 20th, 2018

Young UK adults talk about the issues that matter most to them - and why they should matter to all of us. A new podcast from Radio 4.

29:19 | Dec 18th, 2018

'Gagging clauses' - NDAs or non-disclosure agreements - have been rarely out of the headlines in recent months. High profile cases in business, politics and celebrity life have prompted calls for an outright ban, particularly when used to cover up ap...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

38:23 | Dec 14th, 2018

Presenting his first programme for Radio 4, the evolutionary biologist, author and former Professor for Public Understanding of Science, Richard Dawkins, investigates trust in science. It's an issue of concern for scientists as well as others. Despit...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:55 | Dec 11th, 2018

Claire Cunningham is a Scottish choreographer and contemporary dancer who performs with crutches. We join her in the studio during the research period for a new work, Thank You Very Much, which draws on Claire’s current fascination with Elvis Tribute...Show More

29:09 | Dec 7th, 2018

The Berlin-based Argentinian artist, Tomás Saraceno, trained as an architect. He was struck by the beauty of spider webs, their structural intricacy and began making them into sculptural works. Then he realised that every time a spider tugs a string ...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:25 | Dec 4th, 2018

Documentary adventures that encourage you to take a closer listen. This episode follows a line of connection through four women across two referendums to explore the unexpected consequences of talking about abortion. Starting on live television at a ...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

58:07 | Nov 30th, 2018

Music writer and broadcaster Ann Powers explores Joni Mitchell’s impact on her fans and on songwriting. "Even the songs of hers I’ve heard a thousand times can still give me the weird feeling that she knows me personally," she says. In the month of J...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:29 | Nov 27th, 2018

Singer-songwriter Emma Lee Moss (aka Emmy the Great) returns to the playground to re-explore one of her earliest musical influences, the clapping game. Emma finds the playground very much alive with song, new and old . So how is this seemingly old-fa...Show More

29:27 | Nov 23rd, 2018

The sounds of casting, chiming, singing and clanging are fused together to make a magical sound track to the story of how meat cleavers have been used as musical instruments for over 300 years.. Growing up in Suffolk, Nathaniel Mann, heard stories pa...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

58:13 | Nov 20th, 2018

Forty years ago this month, Viv Anderson made his debut for England against Czechoslovakia - the first black player to play for his country. Former footballer Clark Carlisle looks back at the challenges black players faced at a time when racist abuse...Show More

29:20 | Nov 16th, 2018

Artist Emma Critchley meets filmmakers, photographers, sculptors and painters who are drawn beneath the sea to create underwater art. Julie Gautier performs a graceful, lyrical ballet on the floor of the deepest pool in the world. Without a tank of a...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:24 | Nov 13th, 2018

A Thankful or ‘Blessed’ village is a place where every soldier returned alive from World War One. Songwriter Darren Hayman heard about ‘Thankful Villages’ and knew that he had his next album title. He then embarked on a three year odyssey to visit al...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:12 | Nov 9th, 2018

Experimental vocalist and movement artist Elaine Mitchener remembers the life and music of the brilliant New York composer-performer, Julius Eastman, whose work, she feels, has been wrongly overlooked. Born in 1940, Eastman was black and gay when the...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:27 | Nov 6th, 2018

Guy Garvey spent a decade recording his dad’s stories and now he wants you to do the same. When Elbow singer Guy Garvey began to record his father Don's anecdotes, he already knew a lot of the stories he was capturing. What he didn't know was his fat...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

28:28 | Nov 2nd, 2018

Forty years after the infamous 'would you go to bed with me?' experiment, what are the social repercussions of biological inequality if men have a higher sex drive than women?

29:15 | Oct 30th, 2018

Laurie Taylor investigates the people who hear the voices of the dead in recorded sounds - and uncovers the strange and haunting world of auditory illusion. Believers in EVP, or Electronic Voice Phenomena think they're hearing the voices of the beyon...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

57:39 | Oct 26th, 2018

On the fields of battle, and in conflict zones, women reporters are now commonplace but, in the past, the female perspective was much harder to find. War reporters spend their careers giving voice to the survivors of violence, but the reporter's own ...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:15 | Oct 23rd, 2018

Lenny Henry on how to get more young working-class and BAME actors into the industry. Of course, acting is one of the most difficult careers to crack no matter what your background. But the hurdles are certainly higher for aspiring actors from low in...Show More

29:07 | Oct 19th, 2018

Alex Bellos is brilliant at all things mathematical, but even he can't hold a candle to the amazing mathematical feats of the supercalculators. Alex heads to Wolfsburg in Germany to meet the contestants at this year's Mental Calculation World Cup. Th...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:00 | Oct 16th, 2018

Gavin Haynes, editor-at-large of VICE UK, goes in search of this new wave of political thought. On the internet, and on YouTube specifically, a huge new political movement is taking shape in the shoes of a very old one. Some are calling it classical ...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

42:50 | Oct 12th, 2018

Backstage access to director Kwame Kwei-Armah's debut at the Young Vic - his version of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night with music and lyrics by Shaina Taub. Kwame Kwei-Armah is facing high expectations as the new Artistic Director of the Young Vic Theat...Show More
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29:44 | Oct 9th, 2018

Rapper, mother, director, refugee and activist - Maya Arulpragasam is one of Britain's most successful and provocative working-class artists - M.I.A. Ten years on from the release of M.I.A’s single Paper Planes - a global hit blending agitprop pop, s...Show More

29:13 | Oct 5th, 2018

Donald Trump's pledge to build a "big beautiful wall" along the US-Mexico border has inserted a political urgency into the mainstream art world and made the Latino experience a point of inspiration for many. Seven artists working on either side of th...Show More
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58:26 | Oct 2nd, 2018

When a country unilaterally takes back control of its waters, the results are dramatic. This isn't a prediction about Brexit. It's a statement about our recent history. The modern cod wars were a series of disputes (starting in the late 1950s and end...Show More

28:48 | Sep 28th, 2018

How instant noodles, now 60 years old, went from a shed in Japan to global success. What is the most traded legal item in US prisons? Instant Noodles. According to the World Instant Noodles Association, 270 million servings of instant noodles are eat...Show More

28:47 | Sep 25th, 2018

The story of knife crime, told in verse by the weapon itself. Why do teenagers carry knives? How does it feel to live in a world where that's normal? How should we respond to the moral panic generated by the current wave of youth crime? Momtaza Mehri...Show More

28:35 | Sep 21st, 2018

The Sound Odyssey is a new series in which Gemma Cairney takes British artists for musical collaborations in different countries around the world, hearing the musicians in a new light, and exposing their artistic process as they create something new ...Show More

20:15 | Sep 19th, 2018

A story of love, denial and a curious death. Philippe Sands investigates the mysterious disappearance of senior Nazi, Otto Wachter, and journeys right to the heart of the Ratline.
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28:41 | Sep 18th, 2018

"Art saved my life", says David Tovey. He experienced homelessness, homophobia, and despair so deep that he killed himself - twice - before being resuscitated. His ongoing recovery is intertwined with his stunning visual and textile work, which has b...Show More
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29:21 | Sep 14th, 2018

In 1977 the sculptor Walter De Maria erected a field of stainless steel poles in the New Mexico high desert, where lighting frequently strikes. The only way to see this electrifying art work, one of the largest sculptures on earth, is to spend the ni...Show More
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29:36 | Sep 11th, 2018

Actress and broadcaster Jameela Jamil tackles the explosive conversation around sexual assault to determine what consent in sex and relationships should look like in a modern, digital world. The recent sexual assault allegations that have surfaced fr...Show More
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29:35 | Sep 11th, 2018

Actress and broadcaster Jameela Jamil tackles the explosive conversation around sexual assault to determine what consent in sex and relationships should look like in a modern, digital world. The recent sexual assault allegations that have surfaced fr...Show More
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28:22 | Sep 7th, 2018

Technology writer Leigh Alexander explores the growing popularity of analogue culture in a digital world. For 30-something technology writer Leigh, the digital world is just a part of her everyday life - there's no logging off. But despite all the bo...Show More
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28:44 | Sep 4th, 2018

Thirty years ago the British government took an almost unprecedented decision - to ban the voices of Sinn Fein and other groups in Northern Ireland associated with terrorism from being heard on television and radio. The Belfast based broadcaster Step...Show More
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58:06 | Aug 31st, 2018

Emmett Till, 14 & black, was put on the train from Chicago by his mother Mamie in August 1955. She got him back in a pine box. His corpse mutilated & stinking. He had been beaten, shot and dumped in the Tallahatchie River for supposedly whistling at ...Show More

29:21 | Aug 28th, 2018

In February 2017, President Trump made a speech to his supporters. He moved on to the topic of immigration and Sweden. "You look at what's happening last night in Sweden," he told the crowd at a rally in Florida. "They took in large numbers; they're ...Show More
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29:05 | Aug 24th, 2018

As Britain opens the latest in a series of large new jails, architect Danna Walker looks at the unique tensions in architecture's relationship with the judicial system - where the go-to design for prisons is 250 years old, and where ideological confl...Show More

28:54 | Aug 21st, 2018

According to Charles W. Eliot - President of Harvard and cousin of T.S. - everything required for a complete, liberal education could fit on a shelf of books just 5-feet in length. In 1909 the first volume of the Harvard Classics were published - and...Show More
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37:58 | Aug 17th, 2018

Donald Trump and his supporters have spoken of a Deep State in America, undermining his presidency from within - a shadowy coalition of security and intelligence services, hidden from plain sight, bent on sabotaging an elected government. The term ha...Show More

29:10 | Aug 14th, 2018

If you are a parent, you probably do not need an introduction to Fortnite Battle Royale. It's the online video game that's been absorbing the minds and time of millions of children and young adults since its launch last September. To the uninitiated,...Show More

17:36 | Aug 13th, 2018

In a special edition of the science and comedy podcast to mark the 100th episode, Brian Cox and Robin Ince reminisce about their favourite moments from the show.
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28:39 | Aug 10th, 2018

Horizontal stripes have been used to draw the eye and sign-post the audacious for centuries - from Medieval miniatures to the films of Tim Burton. Whether used on a lighthouse or a zebra crossing, stripes grab our attention and in the very same momen...Show More

57:46 | Aug 7th, 2018

Broadcaster and comedian Steve Punt scours the archives to exhume the often pretentious and opinionated philosophical outpourings of pop stars through the ages. With the help of music journalists Paul Morley, Kate Mossman, DJ and record producer ...Show More

29:05 | Aug 3rd, 2018

The American satirist Joe Queenan goes in search of sovereignty. He wants to know what it is, what's it for, and how old it is "Now I know this is a big issue for you all right now. Over here we've been fighting over sovereignty since the eightie...Show More

31:27 | Jul 31st, 2018

Donegal is an Irish county where silence is a virtue. You can find it in the desolate landscape, the big skies and far horizons - but silence can be found in the people too. Maybe it's discretion or reticence. It could be shyness or a kind of wisdom....Show More

1:00:04 | Jul 27th, 2018

BBC political correspondent Chris Mason examines the changing accents of politics and politics of accents, with help from politicians, language experts and an impersonator. The programme examines the ways that stereotypes and prejudices can be loa...Show More
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31:35 | Jul 24th, 2018

Journalist Marverine Cole explores why some black women in the UK are more prone to anxiety and depression. Research suggests that women of African-Caribbean heritage living in the UK are more likely to suffer from anxiety, depression, panic attac...Show More
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30:34 | Jul 20th, 2018

Why are the Japanese having less sex? Chie Kobayashi and Ruth Evans investigate. Kunio Kitamura, the head of Japan's family planning association is worried he may soon be out of a job. The birth rate, condom use, the pill, abortions and sexually t...Show More
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1:01:21 | Jul 17th, 2018

Journalist and author Jonathan Freedland looks at how journalists and newspapers have been depicted in fiction from the advent of the mass popular press to the present day, examining the changing public image of the fourth estate and its practitioner...Show More
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30:44 | Jul 13th, 2018

Former gang member Simeon Moore (aka Zimbo) sets out to explore, challenge and understand the complex relationship between certain urban art forms and knife violence. The recent increase in incidents of knife crime has flooded our media, yet for S...Show More
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31:12 | Jul 10th, 2018

Music writer John Doran ventures into the strange world of Richard D James. Over the course of three decades James, known to his legion of hardcore fans as Aphex Twin, has achieved the primary but evasive aim of most serious musicians - the invention...Show More

30:48 | Jul 6th, 2018

Michael Sheen explores Aneurin Bevan's roots in Tredegar. A spectre is haunting Tredegar. It feels a little like that at least. This town high in the South Wales Valleys is understandably proud of its most famous son and makes the most of his memo...Show More
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31:22 | Jul 3rd, 2018

In the light of the phenomenal success of the Black Panther movie, Emma Dabiri explores the resurgence of Afrofuturism in arts, and particularly in music. Afrofuturism is a term used to describe much art and music of black of origin, often when it...Show More
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31:47 | Jun 29th, 2018

In 1977, Africa Liberation Day took place in Handsworth Park, Birmingham. Vanley Burke was there to document it. Now he meets four of the people he caught on camera. All children of Windrush immigrants, they were the first generation to be born in...Show More
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1:01:12 | Jun 26th, 2018

Bonnie Greer tells the story of one of the most famous sporting contests of all time - a boxing match in June 1938 between the American Joe Louis and the German Max Schmeling. The fight took on massive international, social and cultural significance ...Show More

31:51 | Jun 22nd, 2018

The writer and illustrator Judith Kerr has created some of our best-loved books for children since publishing her first, and perhaps most famous book, 'The Tiger Who Came to Tea', which celebrates its 50th birthday this year. Judith's life has alw...Show More
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32:20 | Jun 19th, 2018

The echo has always been a source of fascination for composer and sound designer Sarah Angliss. She reveals how writers, poets and musicians have tried to capture and bottle the thrill of the echo down the ages. Sarah travels to Maidenhead to enco...Show More

30:47 | Jun 15th, 2018

A convent of Mexican nuns is helping to save the one of the world's most endangered and most remarkable amphibians: the axolotl, a truly bizarre creature of serious scientific interest worldwide and an animal of deep-rooted cultural significance in M...Show More
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59:42 | Jun 12th, 2018

How do the rich and the poor live together, side-by-side every day? Journalist Cole Moreton walks across the London Borough of Kensington in a revealing series of real-life encounters that build and tell a story like a drama. From a food hall to a...Show More

30:50 | Jun 8th, 2018

So - how slow are we talking about, when it comes to art? French anarchist vegetarian artists Elizabeth Saint-Jalmes & Cyril Leclerc rescue snails bound for the cooking pot, and display them as a sound and light installation - Slow Pixel - before ...Show More
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30:19 | Jun 5th, 2018

New Yorker Huey Morgan examines the life, work and enduring appeal of a musician known as Moondog who lived and worked on the city's streets in the 1950s and 60s. Born Louis Thomas Hardin in Kansas in May 1916, he played musical instruments from a...Show More
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59:07 | Jun 1st, 2018

Stuart Maconie celebrates the golden age of the music press interview. In the heyday of the printed music media between the mid-sixties and the early noughties, the music interview was many things - combative, intimate, confessional, unhinged, fli...Show More

59:02 | May 29th, 2018

It is 175 years since the word "commuter" was used for the first time. (The word does not in fact describe a traveller, it describes a transaction: regular travellers on the railroad into Manhattan were given the opportunity to "commute" their indivi...Show More
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40:16 | May 25th, 2018

Jonathan Freedland recalls the extraordinary day in 1948 when Israel declared its independence. On May 14 1948, a few hundred people crammed into the Tel Aviv Museum of Art to hear a proclamation that would change the course of history - and alter...Show More

30:53 | May 22nd, 2018

Since Ireland's independence, the Catholic Church has played a preeminent role in defining morality south of the border. However in recent decades, its position as moral arbiter has come under attack. Congregation sizes have fallen dramatically, and ...Show More
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29:54 | May 18th, 2018

Over the sound of ripping wax-strips, nail drills, clippers and trimmers, Toyah Willcox invites us to eavesdrop on usually private conversations taking place in hair and beauty salons across the UK. We drop in on appointments at Totally Polished i...Show More

30:19 | May 15th, 2018

Are plants rather cleverer than once thought? Scientists from around the world are claiming that plants cannot just sense, but communicate, learn and remember. In an experiment in Australia, plants appeared to learn to associate a sound with a food s...Show More
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29:54 | May 11th, 2018

Join the gravelly-voiced Welsh poet Twm Morys as he takes a sonorous journey into a world of sound-harmony and chiming consonants, to explore the ancient craft of Cynghanedd. Over many centuries, the people of Wales developed a unique set of poeti...Show More
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31:18 | May 8th, 2018

Art collector and broadcaster Alvin Hall, examines how the dynamic work of African-American self-taught artists is gaining recognition from American institutions today - and how much more needs to be done to address this neglected canon. Having to...Show More
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32:40 | May 4th, 2018

"I don't date black women." This is a phrase Bridgitte Tetteh has heard many times. Black, single and searching for Mr Right, she was even told by one man that he was looking for a white wife "to help him progress in society". Shifting attitudes t...Show More
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30:46 | May 1st, 2018

Artist and sceptic Adham Faramawy asks if virtual reality's fantastical spaces can offer new ways to make and experience art. He sets out to discover what VR can offer beyond the shock of its novelty - from new bodies to new lovers, to new spaces for...Show More
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30:20 | Apr 27th, 2018

Turner-prize nominated artist Roger Hiorns has always been fascinated by the idea of burying aeroplanes. "The idea is to take infrastructure from the world - an object that is so powerful and so dominant - and essentially put it in your own contex...Show More
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29:39 | Apr 24th, 2018

The American journalist Sally Herships has long felt she carries within herself a sense of the trauma suffered by her grandmother a century ago, in Russia, and subsequently passed down through her own mother. How is it possible to explain a fear that...Show More

29:28 | Apr 20th, 2018

In 2014 Polly Weston's sister Lara died. She had just turned 22. Lara and her family had never discussed organ donation, and she wasn't on the register. But when the family were asked if they would consider donation, they said yes. Out of the tragedy...Show More

30:38 | Apr 17th, 2018

Journalist and author Sathnam Sanghera returns to his home town of Wolverhampton where a battle raged over the right to wear the turban on the buses in Enoch Powell's constituency at the time he made his Rivers of Blood speech. In 1967 Sikh bus dr...Show More
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38:22 | Apr 12th, 2018

Jonathan Izard killed a man in a road traffic accident. It wasn't his fault. In an attempt to come to terms with what happened, he tries to get to know the man he killed, Michael Rawson. Jonathan goes back to the place on the road where his car hi...Show More
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30:56 | Apr 10th, 2018

Mansoor Adayfi spent 15 years detained without charge at the American military prison in Guantanamo Bay. Now released, he guides us vividly through an unlikely exhibit of artworks made by former and current Guantanamo war-on-terror detainees. The ...Show More

32:48 | Apr 6th, 2018

Adam Tjolle is a vet with two brains - who once starred on the BBC's Animal Hospital. His second brain - in reality a slow-growing tumour - was discovered by accident on a scan when he fell off his bike. The presenter of the programme, his friend ...Show More

29:29 | Mar 30th, 2018

BBC 6 Music's Chris Hawkins listens to new music every day - and he's noticing a trend. More and more of the bands he plays on the station are writing about politics. Acts like Nadine Shah, Cabbage, Idles and Life are covering topics as diverse as T...Show More

31:49 | Mar 20th, 2018

Rajesh speaks with Professor David Spiegelhalter of Cambridge University who has been collecting stories of coincidence since 2011. Rajesh wants to find out why he is so prone to coincidence. Along with discovering mind blowing coincidences Rajesh se...Show More

31:44 | Mar 11th, 2018

The relationship between mothers and sons as depicted in the arts is complex and, as anyone familiar with Medea's story will attest, not always terribly positive. As Lauren Laverne discovers, however, there are many examples of stories, films and ...Show More

59:48 | Mar 6th, 2018

For thousands of years, bald men have been the subject of ridicule. As a result they've felt ashamed and have resorted to desperate measures to hide their condition. During the decades when hair style was a cultural battleground between youth and the...Show More
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31:02 | Mar 2nd, 2018

As Athens struggles through what's been called a "forever crisis", the critic Alastair Sooke reports on the arts boom in Greece. Culture is experiencing a moment of richness in debt-stricken Athens. In light of declining state support for the arts...Show More

1:00:39 | Feb 27th, 2018

Twenty years ago, in February 1998, one of the most serious public health scandals of the 20th century was born, when researcher, Andrew Wakefield and his co-authors published a paper in the medical journal The Lancet suggesting a link between the MM...Show More

31:41 | Feb 23rd, 2018

Dawn Walton, artistic director of Eclipse, the black theatre touring company, was bored of only ever coming across three black stories in British theatres - slavery stories, immigrant stories, and gang stories. She knew there was a far greater range ...Show More

59:52 | Feb 20th, 2018

How cunning is Donald Trump? In Queenan on Cunning, the satirist Joe Queenan explores a word rarely associated with the current President of the USA. "From Odysseus to Bismarck, via Brer Rabbit and Machiavelli's The Prince, there's a fine tradi...Show More

31:49 | Feb 16th, 2018

The work of the entomologist very often involves the killing of insects in large numbers. This happens in the search for new species in the exploration of the planet's biodiversity and in ecological investigations to monitor the health of wild insect...Show More

32:01 | Feb 13th, 2018

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia or CLL, is the most common form of leukaemia. It's a disease which kills. The most common treatment is with chemotherapy. If that doesn't work, most patients can only expect to live for another few years at most. But ...Show More

1:00:42 | Feb 9th, 2018

Illegitimacy once meant you were a 'bastard'. The MP Caroline Flint wants to know what the word 'illegitimate' means now. Caroline has always been open about her unmarried Mum having her when she was 17 years old and that she had her first son bef...Show More
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30:52 | Feb 6th, 2018

Helen Pankhurst presents the previously untold story of one of the foremost Suffragettes, as she uncovers her grandmother Sylvia's role in the fight for Ethiopian Independence, and reveals a lifelong love for the fascinating country that became her h...Show More
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1:00:42 | Feb 2nd, 2018

Julian Pettifer, the BBC's 'man in Saigon' during the Vietnam War, reflects on the Tet Offensive of 1968 as a turning point in world history. On the evening of 30th January 1968, Julian dined with his cameraman Ernie Christie in a hotel in Saigon,...Show More

30:35 | Jan 30th, 2018

The brain - the final frontier. Radio 4 is setting out on an exploration of the creative mind. Gerald Scarfe's drawings have intrigued and alarmed for more than fifty years but where do his ideas come from? Professor Vincent Walsh of the Institute...Show More
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59:28 | Jan 26th, 2018

Generation X author Douglas Coupland explores the ideas, sound and vision of media seer Marshall McLuhan who in the 1960s coined the phrases "the medium is the message" and "the global village". Marshall McLuhan was the first great prophet of what...Show More
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36:34 | Jan 24th, 2018

Fifth of five special podcasts marking the centenary of the first women in the UK gaining the vote. Lyse Doucet interviews remarkable women from across the world who are making a real impact on the democratic process in their countries. Lyse Douce...Show More
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33:19 | Jan 24th, 2018

Fourth of five special podcasts marking the centenary of the first women in the UK gaining the vote. Lyse Doucet interviews remarkable women from across the world who are making a real impact on the democratic process in their countries. BBC Chief...Show More
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32:17 | Jan 24th, 2018

Third of five special podcasts marking the centenary of the first women in the UK gaining the vote. Lyse Doucet interviews remarkable women from across the world who are making a real impact on the democratic process in their countries. In 1980, t...Show More
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31:52 | Jan 24th, 2018

Second of five special podcasts marking the centenary of the first women in the UK gaining the vote. Lyse Doucet interviews remarkable women from across the world who are making a real impact on the democratic process in their countries. Lyse Douc...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

31:50 | Jan 24th, 2018

First of five special podcasts marking the centenary of the first women in the UK gaining the vote. Lyse Doucet interviews remarkable women from across the world who are making a real impact on the democratic process in their countries. Monica McW...Show More

1:02:28 | Jan 23rd, 2018

From the nomads of the vast steppe - to the glamour and adulation of the stage. Kate Molleson unravels the story of Mongolia's remarkable rise to being an opera superpower. And, in this special double bill, producer Steven Rajam joins Rhianna Dhillo...Show More
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1:00:21 | Jan 19th, 2018

January 2018 is the 200th anniversary of the publication of Frankenstein - Mary Shelley's extraordinary, ground-breaking novel about the creation of a living being who becomes a monster. Cultural historian and writer Christopher Frayling considers ho...Show More

29:51 | Jan 9th, 2018

Luke Jerram is that rare bird, a genuinely popular yet acclaimed contemporary artist. And he's obsessed with the moon. So he's made one: seven metres wide featuring 120dpi detailed NASA imagery, and he's taking it around the world. This is his story,...Show More

31:25 | Jan 5th, 2018

How do we prepare for the distant future? Helen Keen meets the people who try to. If our tech society continues then we can leave data for future generations in huge, mundane quantities, detailing our every tweet and Facebook 'like'. But how long ...Show More

30:07 | Dec 29th, 2017

For centuries tales were shared around the camp-fire; modern settlements share data via wi-fi. But what hasn't changed across the ages is our passion for histories and information - we shape and make sense of our lives by telling stories about what h...Show More

30:28 | Dec 26th, 2017

Zoologist and founder of the Sloth Appreciation Society, Lucy Cooke, unleashes her inner sloth to discover why being lazy could actually be the ultimate evolutionary strategy. The explorers of the New World described sloths as 'the lowest form of ...Show More

30:54 | Dec 22nd, 2017

Dreaming of a Dark Christmas, in Iceland At the darkest time of the year in Iceland scary creatures come out to play. Storyteller Andri Snær Magnason used to be terrified by his grandmother's Christmas tales of Gryla the 900 year old child eating ...Show More

29:43 | Dec 19th, 2017

Historian and psychoanalyst Daniel Pick of Birkbeck College, University of London tells the story of how aerial bombardment - from Zeppelins to B52s, from H-Bombs to drones - has made the unconscious mind a field of battle. Daniel explores how, in...Show More
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43:31 | Dec 15th, 2017

Rhianna Dhillon speaks to Eloise Garland about her journey to explore how people with hearing loss engage with music, challenging assumptions about the deaf community. Eloise began to lose her own hearing fifteen years ago. Now aged 23, she's a pr...Show More

30:08 | Dec 12th, 2017

Why do some of us do bizarre things in our sleep? Like riding a motorbike, using a shoe to 'phone for a pizza or even having sex while sleeping? These are complex behaviours and yet sleepwalkers aren't aware of what they're doing and often have no me...Show More
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29:42 | Dec 8th, 2017

There's science, music, poetry and the deepest human experience in the rhythm of the heartbeat. That rhythm - the normal, heaving violence and beauty of an inner beast - sets the tempo for everything we do. That is when it's dancing in time. Becau...Show More
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29:11 | Dec 5th, 2017

Novelist, Harvard Fellow and Social Entrepreneur Zia Haider Rahman explores the powerful impact the use and abuse of metaphor can have on the world around us. Metaphors are not simply there for the use of novelists or poets. They are integral to t...Show More
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30:23 | Dec 1st, 2017

When the poet Frank Ormsby was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease, his response was unexpected. He embarked on a newly fertile creative period, documenting his experiences and finding a voice in his poetry that he was beginning to lose in his daily c...Show More

46:16 | Nov 29th, 2017

Byron Vincent joins the Violence Reduction Unit in Glasgow to see how they turn young men away from lives of violence and chaos. Three years ago, after he discussed his own violent and chaotic youth in a Four Thought talk on Radio 4, Byron was in...Show More

29:40 | Nov 24th, 2017

"The more we reinforce the stereotypes of who writes and who reads, the more the notion of exclusivity is reinforced. It takes balls to gatecrash a party." Kit de Waal, published her first novel, My Name is Leon, in 2016 at the age of 55. She has ...Show More
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29:56 | Nov 21st, 2017

Journalist Jonathan Guyer examines the different forms of noir fiction addressing the failed revolutions, jihadism, and chaos in Egypt. Away from caliphate building and sectarianism, a neo-noir revolution has been creeping across the Middle East, ...Show More
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30:43 | Nov 17th, 2017

Protest art in Latin America. A continent-wide commitment by many artists to social activism makes Latin America not just one of the most diverse art scenes in the world - but also one of the most compelling, with music, visual arts and street art ca...Show More
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30:39 | Nov 14th, 2017

Trevor Dann reports from the USA on an innovative scheme which helps military veterans suffering with post traumatic stress by pairing them with songwriters. Former soldiers discuss the therapeutic effects of creating songs about their experiences...Show More
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30:43 | Nov 10th, 2017

Tayo Popoola explores Nigeria's enduring love of Jim Reeves and country music. Over 50 years after his death, American country music legend Jim Reeves has maintained his popularity to a truly remarkable extent. Up until the 1980s, his label RCA c...Show More

59:41 | Nov 7th, 2017

Filmmaker Mike Figgis explores the story of edited film, audio and culture, and how the simple process of cutting and splicing has changed the way people view the world. We are living in an age of the edit. From the jump-cuts of Eisenstein and...Show More

29:33 | Nov 6th, 2017

A century ago, the Russian Revolution took place. It was a seismic event that changed the course of the 20th century. In this special, bonus episode of Seriously…, we visit four cities closely linked to the events of 1917. With Moscow correspo...Show More

29:49 | Nov 3rd, 2017

Savitri Devi-devotee of Hitler, proponent of Hindu nationalism, associate of both the British BNP and the American Nazi party-was a prolific author and energetic member of the international Nazi network after the Second World War. Now, her paeans to ...Show More

29:46 | Oct 31st, 2017

"3 May. Bistritz. Left Munich at 8:35 P. M, on 1st May, arriving at Vienna early next morning; should have arrived at 6:46, but train was an hour late." The first line of Bram Stoker's Dracula makes it clear what the novel will be about: trains. A...Show More

30:15 | Oct 27th, 2017

The events in Charlottesville were just one example of the sharp rise in the number of violent confrontations in America between far-right white nationalists and left-wing groups known as 'antifa' - short for "anti-fascists". Those on the right c...Show More

58:57 | Oct 17th, 2017

Once upon a time, total surveillance was the province of George Orwell and totalitarian states, but we now live in a world where oceans of data are gathered from us every day by the wondrous digital devices we have admitted to our homes and that we c...Show More

31:11 | Oct 13th, 2017

The relationship between fathers and daughters has been the subject of countless cultural explorations down the centuries, from Elektra's distress to Bonjour Tristesse. Some of them are idealised ('To Kill A Mockingbird', 'All the Lights We Cannot Se...Show More

30:22 | Oct 10th, 2017

The Russian Revolution unleashed a brand of humour that continues to this day. In this two-part series, comedian and Russophile Viv Groskop explores a century of revolutionary comedy and asks how it continues to shape the national psyche. The ser...Show More

30:27 | Oct 3rd, 2017

A portrait of singer, songwriter and truck driver Will Beeley. The myth of the road is deeply rooted in America - it's the thing that delivers escape, promises freedom, fuels new hopes and, once upon a time at least, thoughts of a new nation. And ...Show More

29:43 | Sep 29th, 2017

Not everyone appreciates the tonalities, lyrics or even the shrieky voice of Canadian artist and musician Joni Mitchell but in a dusty class room in 1971 Lynne Truss decided she loved the writer of Woodstock, Big Yellow Taxi and Both Sides Now. It wa...Show More

31:03 | Sep 26th, 2017

Tiny bathers relax in a puddle of oily water on a pavement; a galleon sails on the head of a pin, a dancer twirls next to a mote of dust under a microscope - Dr Lance Dann, lover of miniature worlds, crouches down on hands and knees to better observe...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

33:04 | Sep 22nd, 2017

The poet Ross Sutherland takes a visceral look at the art of professional wrestling - from its violent theatre to its tendency to bleed through the fourth wall. Exploring the porous boundary between the reality of the ring and the world outside, sear...Show More

30:05 | Sep 19th, 2017

Lots of people wear wigs, and go to great lengths to keep them secret - but why? Perhaps it's because the hair on top of our heads means so much to us. It's a crucial part of our identity, the person we see when we look in the mirror, so what happens...Show More

31:58 | Sep 15th, 2017

With more than 30 million presentations being given around the world every day, PowerPoint has become the single most ubiquitous tool for presenting ideas. Yet it's the software many of us love to hate - vilified for simplifying the complex and compl...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

29:33 | Sep 12th, 2017

This summer's spate of acid attacks have caused concern for both the public and authorities. The seemingly random selection of victims by perpetrators, and the suspected use of acid by criminal gangs, seems to be a new twist in a story which has prev...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

30:08 | Sep 8th, 2017

What stories are hiding among the paints and pigments in an art supplies shop? L Cornelissen & Son has been supplying artists since the 19th century. Based in a little shop near the British Museum, it's a Victorian throwback - all dark wood, high ...Show More

29:57 | Sep 5th, 2017

After the violence directed at black people in Nottingham and Notting Hill in the 1950s, and the naked racism expressed in Smethwick during the 1964 general election, a group of pioneering West Indians came up with a simple and defiant riposte: Carni...Show More

58:48 | Aug 31st, 2017

Marking the 20th anniversary of her untimely death, Archive on 4 presents a unique and moving portrait of Diana, Princess of Wales - her life documented in reverse chronology. Diana, Princess of Wales was arguably the most famous - and most photog...Show More

39:01 | Aug 29th, 2017

Suicide is the number one killer of men under-50 in England and Wales. A 'zero suicide' approach to prevention first devised in Detroit is now changing attitudes to care in the UK. Merseyside is leading the way. Radio 4 gains exclusive access to a he...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

30:18 | Aug 25th, 2017

Etiquette expert and author William Hanson was raised to say 'what' over 'pardon', 'sofa' over 'couch' and, of course, 'lavatory' rather than 'toilet'. In other words, he's very much U rather than Non-U. These terms first came to light in 1954 whe...Show More

59:33 | Aug 22nd, 2017

Grayson Perry goes backwards in the archive in search of the moment the avant-garde died. It's a century since Marcel Duchamp submitted his artwork called Fountain to an exhibition staged by the Society of Independent Artists in New York. Fountain...Show More

30:45 | Aug 18th, 2017

Bill Drummond is many things. As well as an artist, a writer and former pop-star - he's the owner of an old curfew tower in Northern Ireland which he runs as an artists' residency. Last year some poets from Belfast's Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry s...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

30:12 | Aug 15th, 2017

Impressionist Rory Bremner explores the role of the human voice in forensic phonetics. Forensic phonetics - or voice identification - has long been used in legal proceedings to help determine if the voice on a recording is that of the defendant. B...Show More
ARCHIVED: The podcast creator has made this episode no longer available for listening.

39:09 | Aug 4th, 2017

Since the Grenfell Tower fire in June, the architectural dream of Le Corbusier's 'streets in the sky' has, in many minds, become a living nightmare. Every high rise building in the country, and each of their residents, has become embroiled in the Gre...Show More

59:14 | Aug 1st, 2017

It's time to travel down the rabbit hole of truth as American satirist Joe Queenan explores a murky world of fake news, prejudice and alternative facts. "Recent politics have shown that the truth is no fun," he explains. "It's like a vegetable your...Show More

30:01 | Jul 28th, 2017

The sound of music flying through the air, carried on the tails of pigeons. "I